minor pentatonic scale on major chord progression.

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minor pentatonic scale on major chord progression.

Postby cpt.blueZ » Thu May 03, 2007 9:05 pm

Now this will only help another blues rookie like me, so you older blues dogs won't think this to be much of a revelation, but it did expand things a little for me.

I use minor pentatonic blues scales with minor and 7th chord progressions,
example: A7(1), D7(4), E7(5) with the scale played in A position.
but the scale don't seem to work with Amajor, Dmajor, Emajor.

I have an instructional dvd called "Big Phat A$$ Guitar" by Leslie West/Mountain from which I got this nugget.

minor pentatonic scales don't really sound right with major chords but, if you find the relative minor of the key, and play the minor pentatonic blues scale in that keys relative minor position it works.
Example: A(1), D(4), E(5) play the scale from F# position, since F#is the relative minor to A.
Niffty :wink:
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Postby ricochet » Fri May 04, 2007 1:15 am

What you're now doing is playing the major pentatonic scale of A. :D
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Postby cpt.blueZ » Fri May 04, 2007 2:36 am

Ahh Soo!! this is great, I always wondered what a Major pentatonic scale was.
Cool!!!8)
ThanX
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Postby leftyguitarman » Fri May 04, 2007 4:44 am

All these odd words make my head spin.
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Postby ricochet » Fri May 04, 2007 1:26 pm

And you didn't have to smoke, drink or snort anything.
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Postby 1four5 » Fri May 04, 2007 4:03 pm

My whole fretboard exploded when this light came on for me... our lead guitar player drew me a picture of the whole fretboard, and marked all the pentatonic notes...and I asked him for what key? and he said don't worry about that, just learn the pattern...any way you can. Boxes...runs...little chunks...intravals, whatever, just get them in your head. I did it.

Then he told me it was like a transparecy. You only have to learn the scale once. Then just move it wherever you need it.

That was 3 years ago. Now I'm all over the place... sometimes the minor scale stays in one location. Sometimes I jump between minor and major. Sometimes the minor moves with the progression. Sometimes I play minor over the I chord and majors over the IV and V chords...sometimes I get totally lost but just keep playing until find my way back :shock: 8)
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Postby leftyguitarman » Fri May 04, 2007 5:58 pm

ricochet wrote:And you didn't have to smoke, drink or snort anything.


Says who?

Just kidding. I dont do any of that stuff.
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Postby ricochet » Fri May 04, 2007 6:44 pm

Well, you didn't HAVE to...
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Postby Axis29 » Sat May 05, 2007 1:09 am

Try playing both scales together! That opened up all sorts of stuff for me. And add thoseblues scale notes...

At the fifth fret in A it looks like this:

---(5)-----7--8
---5-- 6--7--8
4--5-- 6--7--8
4--5-----(7)---
4--5- -6--7--8
---(5)-----7--8

Now you have a ten note scale! That's a lot to choose from!

Of course, you gotta be careful and not get too 'notey', but having more notes to choose from can make different runs within the same song really interesting. However, running it all together in one run sounds a bit ... ah.. busy?

Sometimes it's all on the phrasing! And sometimes it's about breaking some of the rules to get what you hear in your head out into the open!

I gotta say, I've been playing minor scales over major and dominant chords for years and had a pretty good time at it!

I've really been experimenting with a lot of major scales lately just to expand my knowledge, ear and playing skills. Fun ain't it?
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Postby cpt.blueZ » Sat May 05, 2007 11:24 pm

ThanX for adding to this thread Axis29(and all ya'll), my guitar is really starting to talk to me. I am paying attention, putting into practice, and truely discovering a new language. :D
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Postby mickeypainless » Sun May 06, 2007 4:47 am

>>>my guitar is really starting to talk to me.

Mine do that from time to time...... maybe it's just when I'm doin the stuff that Lefty don't do?!?!?!? :roll:
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Postby leftyguitarman » Sun May 06, 2007 5:08 am

That could possibly be.....
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Postby cas » Mon May 07, 2007 10:10 pm

Mickey....stop sniffing the thrush medication (Kopertox?), it'll help with the delusions.

Carol :lol:
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Postby TC90 » Wed May 23, 2007 2:32 am

I'm just now getting to the point of incorporating more major scale usage. When I first learned about the major scale and relative minor, it kind of made my head spin. I understand theory a bit, but it was still confusing. Then someone told me to "just move your minor pentatonic three frets back, and you have your major pentantonic"

Three frets back
Three frets back
Three frets back


Kind of cheatin', but it gets ya' playin'

:D
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Postby ricochet » Wed May 23, 2007 3:15 am

And you won't hear it unless you do it while playing over an accompaniment. All you'll hear is your normal minor blues stuff in a different key. When you move three frets back and play over an accompaniment in the original key, you'll find the original patterns don't sound right anymore. You have to land on the original root notes and the riffs change to sound "right." You're in the major pentatonic or major blues scale now. It's a whole new thing.
:D
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