Leads

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Leads

Postby stumblin » Mon Nov 13, 2006 11:00 am

Not news for most of you, I guess, not really news to me either, but I'm sure we've all done this.
Sometimes a lead fails to work properly, I used to put it back in the bag and take it home with me - thinking something like "it's had a good life, maybe it's just a temporary fault, perhaps it'll work next time" etc. Maybe you've done the same thing.
Over the last year or so, I've learned that if a lead fails, it should be left behind at the venue - preferably in the bin.
The cost of a new lead is more than compensated for by the knowledge that your sound won't cut out halfway through the set.
Now that I've got rid of all the non-functioning leads out of my kit-bag, the whole thing weighs several pounds less and it all fits in the bag much easier!
Routine procedure for most of you, I'm sure, but perhaps there's someone else out there who's made the same mistake that I used to.
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Postby bosco » Mon Nov 13, 2006 1:53 pm

perhaps it'll work next time

You don't always have to throw them out, but hoping they'll work next time after you've already had a malfunction is just asking for trouble. Get it out of your case so you can trouble shoot it and not try and use it by mistake again.

Put them on your bench so you can check all of the wiring connections to each jack when you have time. They often come loose with time, I've rarely had one go bad in the middle of the cord somewhere.

If you don't have the time or mechanical inclination to troubleshoot them...then the trash bin is indeed the best place.

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Postby stumblin » Mon Nov 13, 2006 2:17 pm

bosco wrote:perhaps it'll work next time
If you don't have the time or mechanical inclination to troubleshoot them...then the trash bin is indeed the best place.

I'm completely inept when it comes to that kind of tinkering. I don't even own a soldering iron.
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Postby allanlummox » Mon Nov 13, 2006 4:00 pm

I was "lucky" enough to get a bunch of Monster Cable for free a few years ago.

Expensive stuff, and crap. The cables have ends that are easier to take apart and fix - but they required constant messing with to work at all.

After a while, I just started knotting them and chucking them in the bin as soon as they gave me trouble. When the last one got thrown, I still had one lonely, cheap, off brand cable that had been around before the Monster cable had shown up...

Recently, I did get one of those heavy duty, cloth covered cables, but I haven't been using it much outside the practice room.
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Postby Catweazle » Mon Nov 13, 2006 4:06 pm

You don't ever throw the whole cable away. Take it home, slice it up and make some short cables, like mixer to PC, fx pedal connectors, etc.

Waste not want not.
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Postby stratman_27 » Wed Nov 15, 2006 2:44 am

I'm with Cat on this one don't throw the whole cable away. Find the bad part and discard and use the rest for effects patches or whatever. I used to be really bad about stepping on cables during gigs and eventually where I'd step would wear a bad spot in the cable. I usually wait till I have several bad cables and take them to the guitar shop and have them checked. The fellow up there usually will slice and dice them into new usuable shorter cables for parts and a small fee.
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Postby jaybee » Wed Nov 15, 2006 8:20 am

same here: first check the soldering, if everything is ok there, I just cut them in half, use the part that works as is, the part that doesn't gets cut in half again, etc... you end up with a LOT of different sized short cables, but that's the good part: you always have a cable that more or less fits instead of having to use a 6ft length to cover 1.75 ft...
added bonus: when a co-player is in need of a patch cable, you can give them one and say "keep it, I have enough" instead of having to hunt them down to get your patch back because you need it next gig... and it makes you "that nice guy who gave me a patch cable" too 8)
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