Gotta be luck...

Problems, how to get them, favorite songs to play, groupies, funky bar owners, etc. NO names of clubs, please.

Gotta be luck...

Postby allanlummox » Thu Oct 05, 2006 9:47 am

I played a set for the Cascade Blues Association tonight - wedding hall type place, WONDERFUL bunch of people - Bluesslave was shaking my hand as soon as I got out of the cab -

played my set, walked offstage, started to put my little bag of slide and picks together...

and the slide I've used for EVERYTHING lately - the pink slide Ian sent me that has been " the glass socket" for a while now...

Tumbled to the floor.


In wondefully sober slow motion.

Kissed the floor by breaking into wonderful, perfect glass fragments.

While I was picking up glass, a Waiter asked me to...let him. He thought it was a Glass....

I'm shocked at how MUCH of my recent playing has been with that particular slide.

Amazed that the Sears Socket I carry as a backup is longer than I remembered it being.

Damn.

I DO have a bottleneck ( from some Slovene Meade) of similar dimensions.

And that long socket.

And that grey bullet slide from Diamond's hands, lifted once again - the one that LOOKS like a socket.


BUt those pink bits of glass...

on the ballroom floor.




Pretty.
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Postby stumblin » Thu Oct 05, 2006 10:26 am

Bummer.
Commiserations mate.
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Postby allanlummox » Thu Oct 05, 2006 11:17 am

Nah, Andy. I got home in good spirits.

Had a good time playing in a neat room - put some faces to some names - sold some CD's - and had a great night.

The slide broke on the floor in a nice way. I'm messing with all the tubes in my collection tonight to figure out which one I REALLY want to play with now, but otherwise - a tube is a tube.

And it's cool to have a mission in the cube.



( the front runners are still the grey bullet - a Diamond slide - and a too longish but similar Sears Craftsman socket. I swear they used to be a little shorter.)
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Postby dcblues » Thu Oct 05, 2006 1:44 pm

One of bandmates did that once. He had a glass slide. We were playing on a carpeted stage. Where does the slide land when he drops it? On the metal base of the mic stand. The one part of the stage where the slide will hit and shatter.

My response was "I guess that's why Muddy Waters used metal slides."
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Postby jeffl » Thu Oct 05, 2006 6:27 pm

Great mental pic,Dan. I was jus' thinkin' about slides today. I'm gonna ask my buddy who jams at my house to leave his Liberty Coppertop at my house,since he's not playin' it; I've got an old Prairie acoustic leanin' up against my piano,open tuned, but it's not the same as a resonator. I thought I might order a slide from Ian; they're a great piece of art, and something like that,layin' in the base of the lamp on top of my piano might jus' encourage my jammin' buddy (or me) to do a little slidin'. I like leavin' my amps out in the livin' room, by my piano, with the harp case open occasionally; it encourages me to play when I'm jus' walkin' thru, and it gives the whole house an air of creativity and vitality. That slide you broke sounds pretty. I'd prob'ly take the broken pieces, shove 'em into a clear glass bottle of some kind, stick a small light under 'em, and use 'em for an accent light at night (mebbe that'd look like crap,but I'd try it.)
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Postby allanlummox » Fri Feb 09, 2007 8:46 pm

My package from the Midlands arrived today - 2 Diamond Ultimates.

I've been working with the slides mentioned above but - the truth is, I really had gotten used to having a slide that was a perfect fit, like the Ultimate that broke.

Well, here's it's clone - another perfect fit, salmon pink beauty. I try not to 'Blame my tools" too much - but my hands felt "Cleverer" with the familiar dimensions and weight. Probably like a Billiard player having a favorite cue.

Along with it, Ian sent a stunning piece of glass that reminds me of Murano-style glass sculpture. I know that I'll be getting a lot of comments on this one at shows; it's real eye candy.

Dark blue with opaque yellow streaks, about the same fit, heavier and thicker than the Pink one. This item has some serious tone. These slides wouldn't look out of place in an Art Museum.

Once again, Diamond Slides have gone way past my expectations - they have a clearer vision of my ideal slides than I did myself.

Spot on.
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Postby ricochet » Fri Feb 09, 2007 9:16 pm

Nice!

Hang onto that one.

I dropped mine the other day over a hardwood floor. It hit my foot, which ski-jumped it into a fast horizontal trajectory low over the floor instead of a direct impact. Bounced hard off a wall. Still intact. Whew!
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Postby jeffl » Fri Feb 09, 2007 9:24 pm

Without gettin' too mushy here, I'd have to surmise that it's gotta be great for Ian to be able to provide a product that's so beautiful at such low prices compared to the cost of guitars,amps,and other gear. If you're a slider on this board and you haven't yet visited http://www.diamondbottlenecks.com you oughta take a trip over there. It's a wonderful site,and great eye candy, regardless of the utility factor.
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Postby bosco » Sat Feb 10, 2007 2:33 pm

It hit my foot, which ski-jumped it into a fast horizontal trajectory low over the floor instead of a direct impact.

In the grocery biz that's called a "kick save." Extremely useful for prevention of the shattering of jars of spaghetti sauce, salsa, etc. tumbling from the fifth shelf towards the floor.

It's universally accepted among vendors that a sore instep or toe is prefferable to chasing down a mop, wet floor signs and suffering the embarrassment of a broken jar. Almost a matter of pride in fact, not to mention the loss of time involved with a cleanup.

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Postby maxx england » Sat Feb 10, 2007 3:03 pm

I had a glass slide break on the only rock in the field years ago, and now I have my chrome thing. Yes, I'd like to use glass more, but I suffer from almost terminal dyspraxia (ordinary people are just clumsy, I am dyspraxic) so the sensible way is to use the Clankenslide.

Bad news about the original, but at least you've got replacements. And whatever the price, far better value for money than the bits of sawn off curtain rail most shops try to sell you.
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Postby jeffl » Sat Feb 10, 2007 3:31 pm

bosco wrote:It hit my foot, which ski-jumped it into a fast horizontal trajectory low over the floor instead of a direct impact.

In the grocery biz that's called a "kick save." Extremely useful for prevention of the shattering of jars of spaghetti sauce, salsa, etc. tumbling from the fifth shelf towards the floor.

It's universally accepted among vendors that a sore instep or toe is prefferable to chasing down a mop, wet floor signs and suffering the embarrassment of a broken jar. Almost a matter of pride in fact, not to mention the loss of time involved with a cleanup.

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That brought back memories from my grocery store days,Bosco! And,as you well know, you rarely even get much of a ding with those kick saves, as long as you get your foot off the floor and learn to recoil with the impact. I worked in a glass and china warehouse before I started in grocery stores (all during college), so breakage prevention was jus' part of the tricks of the trade. Of course, we had very creative ways of breakin' stuff when we felt like it as well, thanks to wrist rockets and throwin' knives,etc. Among the worst breaks was a bottle of vinegar,pickles, or herring.
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Postby bosco » Sat Feb 10, 2007 4:02 pm

Among the worst breaks was a bottle of vinegar, pickles, or herring.

Yeah, I forgot to mention the associated odors that go with a cleanup.

Of course the "kick save" is a hockey goalie's term, but I wouldn't expect those living much farther south than the great white north to make that association.

Nice that someone can relate. Small world, ain't it Bubba?

:wink:
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Postby jeffl » Sat Feb 10, 2007 4:28 pm

And I can imagine that having your favorite slide break,especially during a gig, would be worse than blowin' out your harp of choice and havin' to go to a backup that you don't like as much. I play alotta blues in G and I keep probably 5 Cs in my case and bag,'cuz there are tunes that I like my Hering 1923 or my Lee Oskar (for bell-like chording and slinky single note leads respectively) and if I blow one up, it's nice to have that comparable backup.
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Postby ricochet » Sat Feb 10, 2007 6:25 pm

I remember hearing the advice to pregnant women that, if their water breaks unexpectedly in the grocery store, they can quickly throw down a jar of pickles as cover. :lol:
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