Stage fright

Problems, how to get them, favorite songs to play, groupies, funky bar owners, etc. NO names of clubs, please.

Postby stumblin » Sat Jun 03, 2006 5:13 pm

gcd revue wrote:If you make a mistake, it's improvisation. If you make the same mistake every time, it's an arrangement. And if you make nothing but mistakes, it's JAZZ!

That's priceless :)
I get very nervous sometimes before playing, to the point of feeling nauseous. I find that a cold beer helps. Just realising that I'm playing because I love it helps a lot too.
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Postby jeffl » Sat Jun 03, 2006 5:57 pm

It's not WHETHER or not you make a mistake,it's usually just a matter of how you react to it. In my experience, the audience won't notice most mistakes,unless you jus' freeze on a tune,which jus' about never happens to anybody. If you're playin' in a band,minor mistakes will go unnoticed,and if you're playin' alone,you can prob'ly cover 'em up too. One thing that a case of nerves can result in is playin' tunes at faster tempos than you practiced 'em at. It also can give you a "billy-goat" vibrato,which'll go away as you settle down. I wuz watchin' a documentary on a rock band on TV,and they talked about when they added a rhythm guitar player to their lineup who was always jacked,and kept pushin' the tempo. In the first year on tour with the new guy,their show shortened up by 10 minutes or sumpin','cuz they were blowin' through the songs so much faster. I think the band was Foghat,but I'm not 100% sure of that.
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Postby tim3finger » Sat Jun 03, 2006 9:31 pm

guitarslim101 wrote:I agree with what has already been said and also add this little tid-bit: make sure your fly is up...unless you have some sort of gimmick involving exposed body parts.


I am the bass player in 1four5's band and my experience was much like his except I don't get real nervous, its not me to get nervous about anything. Besides if you look and act like you are in control, the audience will believe you are, they aren't listening for mistakes, they are listening to the song or your rendition of it.
Also don't forget socks, don't even ask me why I am bothering to tell you that, cause i will deny that I ever forgot any thing on the way to a gig.

Good luck and knock em dead!!

Tim
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Postby 1four5 » Sat Jun 03, 2006 10:21 pm

Why are bass players always so darned layed back and aways so cool? ...even when they show up sockless...8)
Last edited by 1four5 on Sun Jun 04, 2006 12:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby allanlummox » Sat Jun 03, 2006 11:33 pm

It's the shoes.


Bass players always seem to wear cool shoes.
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Postby 1four5 » Sun Jun 04, 2006 12:10 am

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Postby allanlummox » Sun Jun 04, 2006 12:33 am

If those are Birkenstocks, yea, I've seen bassists wearing'em.

If they're from Ross, it's an anomaly.
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Postby allanlummox » Sun Jun 04, 2006 1:31 am

I guess "cool" shoes isn't quite what I meant; but it often seems to me that Bassists have distinctive, comfy looking footwear.
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Postby maxx england » Mon Jun 05, 2006 11:25 am

I just wonder, having seen them over the years all with the same attitude, if bassists are classifiable as the resident Responsible Adult.
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Postby bosco » Mon Jun 05, 2006 12:42 pm

I just wonder, having seen them over the years all with the same attitude, if bassists are classifiable as the resident Responsible Adult.

Not a freakin' chance Maxx...

You haven't met the bass player in my band!

Been married and divorced three times. He's got kids all over town. Has grown children and grandchildren living with him. He's in debt up to his eyeballs. He's addicted to golf to the point where he's been know to play 36 holes in day and show up to a gig so tired he can't stand up and hold his bass. Drinks and smokes WAY too much and has a year 'round repiratory problem. He makes boneheaded decisions regarding gig attire... we'll play at the nicest restaurant in town and all wear black dress slacks and he'll show up in white shorts and a ballcap with flames on it. Has been know to forget his shoes. Has been know to forget his socks. The rest of the band stores and hauls his bass rig...he just shows up to play. Involves himself in so many music projects and bands that he can't do justice to all of them. Wouldn't think twice before parking his beer, smokes and ashtray on top of YOUR thousand dollar tweed boutique amp. Has been known to get the band fired from gigs for telling slacker waitresses to f--- off after receiving poor service.

But the best part is, in spite of all of that crap and potential tension, he's a great guy!

Still think all bass players could be responsible adults? :roll:

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Postby ricochet » Mon Jun 05, 2006 2:49 pm

guitarslim101 wrote:I agree with what has already been said and also add this little tid-bit: make sure your fly is up...unless you have some sort of gimmick involving exposed body parts.
"Hey! Do you know your fly's open and your tallywhacker's hangin' out?"

"Know it? Hell, I WROTE it!"
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Postby bigdaddy » Mon Jun 05, 2006 11:25 pm

When I have a show I eat like an athlete. I eat carbs a couple of hours before start time and I flood my system with protien. The carbs carry me for the first hour or so and then the protien gets converted to energy as my body demands it. I don't get hungry and tho I do tire down I don't really get tired, like hitting a wall tired. I've tried to get the others in the band to do the same and the singer does. No one drinks on stage or during the show. The singer did for the first few gigs and he'd be dumped by the middle of the second set. He's learning. Now he doesn't drink and the show goes off with out a hitch. About stage fright. Like someome has already said, practice is for that. Everyone screws up but because of the time spent practicing a recovery can happen and no one in the audience knows a thing. I am usally nervous for the whole 4 hours but I know I have readied by body with food and readied my skills with practice, now the show is to let it all out and have fun.
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Postby allanlummox » Tue Jun 06, 2006 12:09 am

Right on, Big Daddy.

When I first started out, I'd have a shot or two before the show to steady my nerves - eventually I realized that I played much better, payed more attention, and had a better chance with the ladies in the audience sober.


Not chasing the ladies anymore (one caught me) but the one place you can always be sure to find me sober is onstage.
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Postby rustyslide » Tue Jun 06, 2006 3:12 am

stumblin wrote:I get very nervous sometimes before playing, to the point of feeling nauseous. I find that a cold beer helps. Just realising that I'm playing because I love it helps a lot too.


I am the same way.

I've also found out that the longer you go between playing out, the harder it is to do it again (same as anything I guess); I just ended my hiatus, playing at a friend's wedding, and it was pretty rough leading up to it.
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Postby tim3finger » Wed Jun 14, 2006 3:46 pm

Okay, let me recant a little on not getting nervous before a gig.

I will admit to getting a little aprehensive when we are getting ready to play, if I am not using the same bass as I practiced the set with( like the gig we have friday).

I just finished my custom telebass( pictures later) and I will use it Friday.
Today is the first day I've played it. Minor differences like string spacing, pickup location, neck shape, where it hangs on me(playing postion), are all adding up to get me a little edgy, but, as I said before, the audience isn't listening for my mistakes, just to the song. So, I will probably be fine.

But it is a point I hadn't thought of before. Play your back up axe nearly as much as your main, and you won't have to deal with that totally different feel on short notice, thus, no nervousness.

Tim
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