Ihave been converted to these new cheapo copy guitars

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Ihave been converted to these new cheapo copy guitars

Postby watertore » Sun May 28, 2006 11:54 pm

I have been converted to this new wave of Korean, Japanesse, Korean, guitars. I never thought I would let go of my 63 jazzmaster for a MIK Tokai copy of a 335, but I have-big time. I love this tokai, and the jazzmaster has been in the case for the past 18 months, since I bought it. I took it out a couple of weeks ago to gig with my trio, and wished I had left it home, and brought the Tokai. It is bone stock to boot. I recorded a session today with it, and love the tone I get from it. Any other cheapo knock off heads out there? Walter

todays session: $400 MIK Tokai copy of 335 going through a fender deluxe reverb reissue amp

I'm in the Penitentary
Blowin the high notes
They tell me I have to change my ways
Gonna love you all night long

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pageart ... dID=157137
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Postby ricochet » Mon May 29, 2006 1:17 am

I've got your Tokai's close cousin, an Agile AS-820, made in Korea by the same folks, and I love it!
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Postby watertore » Mon May 29, 2006 1:25 am

ricochet wrote:I've got your Tokai's close cousin, an Agile AS-820, made in Korea by the same folks, and I love it!


I know you are a lover off ways around the big boy stuff and still sound good!
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Postby ricochet » Mon May 29, 2006 1:26 am

Why, thanks, Walter!

And, like you were saying about Louisiana Red, I think you'd sound awesome playing anything.
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Postby watertore » Mon May 29, 2006 4:16 am

ricochet wrote:Why, thanks, Walter!

And, like you were saying about Louisiana Red, I think you'd sound awesome playing anything.


thanks. I remember getting so exicted when Albert collins, and roy buchanan would let me mess around with their rigs. I was ready to sound just like them. Dead wrong. I sounded like old walter. To this day, no matter what I play, unless it is a heavymetal distorted to heck. I sound pretty much the same. I guess I am stuck with me :P
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Postby fat paul » Mon May 29, 2006 5:23 am

If I play a tele I sound like me if I play a gretsch or gibson sg once agen for better or worse I sound like me. Acoustic guitars are a different story but for elect.... call me the king of cheep guitars
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Postby rustyslide » Mon May 29, 2006 12:16 pm

watertore wrote:
ricochet wrote:Why, thanks, Walter!

And, like you were saying about Louisiana Red, I think you'd sound awesome playing anything.


thanks. I remember getting so exicted when Albert collins, and roy buchanan would let me mess around with their rigs. I was ready to sound just like them. Dead wrong. I sounded like old walter. To this day, no matter what I play, unless it is a heavymetal distorted to heck. I sound pretty much the same. I guess I am stuck with me :P


I sound like me too! A friend was playing my new (of January or Febuary, but I've not seen him in a while) Strat, and said "it's nice, but it's missing that nice bluesy Strat sound", which I found odd, so I picked it up, and played it and he said "oh, there it is". Which I was pretty happy to hear.

My Strat is "just" a Japanese one.
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Postby skibumdog » Tue May 30, 2006 1:51 am

Walter, I sound like me too!

Sometime, could you talk about what it was like to be around Roy Buchanan and Albert Collins? These guys were heroes of mine. Roy inspired me to try to play guitar after I came home from Vietnam.
At the time I had not yet heard of Albert Collins. I have heard that Albert actually had some psychic powers as well.
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Postby watertore » Tue May 30, 2006 4:09 am

skibumdog wrote:Walter, I sound like me too!

Sometime, could you talk about what it was like to be around Roy Buchanan and Albert Collins? These guys were heroes of mine. Roy inspired me to try to play guitar after I came home from Vietnam.
At the time I had not yet heard of Albert Collins. I have heard that Albert actually had some psychic powers as well.


skibumdog: First off, thank you for serving our country. Guys like you, made it possible for guys like me, to pursue what my heart sang. Roy was a incredibly kind soul. Very unassuming, but when drunk, a bad man. He dealt with depression big time. He was always kind to me, and inspired me to play guitar. In fact, he insisted I play his guitar. I was so scared, because I mainly was a harp player, and just figuring out the guitar. Anyway, he was so sincere when I picked up his old tele, that I actually let loose with what little I had. He really got into it. It inspired me to keep with the guitar. It was sad to hear he hung himself, but he had a dark side, that never stayed away too long. My buddy evan johns, who along with roy and danny gatlin, were the D.C. guitar heros, told me the cops hung roy. He would get real mean with them when he was drunk, and after years of it, they hung him.


Albert was another true gentle soul. He never forgot anybody he met. I opened for him about 35 times around the world. To sum him up, I tell this story.

We were at the lone star cafe in nyc. I brought my 9 year old brother along to see albert. He loved him, and loved his old bus. Albert put him on his lap, and drove him back to my parents house in Newark, at 4am, with dave on his lap the whole way. When I was living in austin, there was a mexican family band, like the selena thing. The 2 teenage sons sang and one, Raphael played sax too. He knew nothing of blues, but would jam with me,and tear it up. I took Raphael to antones when albert was there. He put him right on stage, next to ac reed. That was albert. He always treated everyone the same, whether you were mick jagger, or somebody like me. On the site below, I have some songs about roy and albert. I can't sound like them. It is their influence working through me. There are over 500 songs, so you have to sift down aways. One is called The last time I saw roy buchanan alive, and albert and roy on my mind. the first song is an acoustic one, and the second, is with my trio. I play guitar and sing. I recorded in my living room, with about 40 people there. To Roy Buchanan, and tele bending, are with my 1 man band set up.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pageart ... dID=157137

I miss both of those guys everyday. Walter

PS: Nigel Price, an author from england, is writing the story of my life. We have been at it for a couple of years now. We talk on the phone, and I record it in my studio, burn it to cd, and he puts it to paper with his own slant.
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Postby mickeypainless » Tue May 30, 2006 5:10 am

Walter,
If some of the stories ya tell here at BRB are snipets of what's to come in yer book, I can't wait to get ahold of a copy! VERY COOL!
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Postby skibumdog » Tue May 30, 2006 12:46 pm

Walter,

Thanks for taking the time to share those phenomenal stories.

Also, the link to your songs. You are an inspiration to people like me, just like Roy and Albert.

Also, put me in line for the book when it comes out.
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Postby watertore » Tue May 30, 2006 3:53 pm

I enjoy sharing these stories. I made a mistake on the albert one. I opened for him about 15, not 35 times. It is sad that you can't go to the root anymore. Most of the old guys are dead. This really saddens me. I took it for granted so long. I was young, and thought they would live forever. That is youth for you. The new crop of blues players just aren't the same. The old guys were much more laid back, and much less business oriented. They placed relationships high on their priorities. I felt this transition occurring during those days. I didn't understand why most of the guys my age, and a bit older, were so distant, and fearful. I never fit in my peer group. I stuck to the old guys because they made me feel welcome. Now that they are gone, and I am not a member of my peer group, it is sad. It is sad, because I have very few pro players that I relate with, and that comrodery that was there when I was young, is long gone. Most pro players now, fear losing their little piece of the music scene to another. I can't handle that. If you are obviously of lesser talent than them, or sound pretty much the same, they welcome you. But, if you are like me, and have your own sound, it evokes fear. That is sad. That wasn't the way the old guys taught us to be. They taught us to be open, appreciative, humble, encouraging, and to continue to pass the groove on to the next generation. They also viewed honesty and conviction, over technical abilities. I am probably the simplest player on this forum, but I let my soul run the songs. Roy, albert, red, sonny terry, cool papa, and the list goes on, always shined on me, even though I knew 1/100th of what most of my peers know. I didn't understand why my peers were so distant with me back then, but I do now. You can know a zillion chords, have the best tone, sound technically perfect, but if you are hiding, it shows front and center, especially to a player that relies on soul over techniques. Again, very sad. Life is to short to fear your peers. They are the ones you should be able to really connect with, share, and grow with. I am thankful I am a simple player. It allows me to not think, because my chords are the natural chords. Anyway, I guess if you want to hear about the old days, it is just cds, and videos now, and guys like me, that got to be close to them.

One more story on this subject. John Popper was opening for junior wells. This guy came up to junior and said- junior listen to that guy play. Man, he can really play that harp. Junior looked at him, disgusted like, and said- he don't know how to play no music. He's just playing scales. That ain't no music.

Walter

Here is a picture of Louisiana Red and me, taken this summer. Red took me in as a teen, and I lived on his couch. He was so kind to me, and taught me, what I call, the art of music. We realized this summer, that Red, now well into his 70's, was the same age I am now, when we first met. Time flies too quickly.

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Postby nizer » Wed May 31, 2006 2:08 pm

Hey Walter, I'm just listening to Roy backing Delbert McClinton doing "The Chokin Kind" on an Alligator compilation. Such soulful, tasty playing - he sure knew what NOT to play! The first time I saw Albert Collins in the 70s I felt like I'd been struck by lightning - in a good way. They sound like outstanding people as well as great musicians and I really appreciate you sharing those stories with us.
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Postby watertore » Thu Jun 01, 2006 8:06 pm

nizer wrote:Hey Walter, I'm just listening to Roy backing Delbert McClinton doing "The Chokin Kind" on an Alligator compilation. Such soulful, tasty playing - he sure knew what NOT to play! The first time I saw Albert Collins in the 70s I felt like I'd been struck by lightning - in a good way. They sound like outstanding people as well as great musicians and I really appreciate you sharing those stories with us.


you are welcome! The first time I saw albert, we were opening for him. I was right at the foot of the stage, because I had never heard him live or his recordings before. Man, I jumped back a few feet when that tone came out, and the looks he made. It felt like he had tapped into the devils soul. Later, we met, and he turned out to be the nicest man on earth.

The best gigs with him, were at Rockefellers, in Houston, tx. The owner liked me, and had my band open for the big shows. I would just sit in a corner of the dressing room, as all alberts buddies came in. They would catch up on old times. Johnny guitar watson was often talked about. Albert lived in ca, so he would update them.


All this talk got me to buying a brand new tokai 52 tele copy. This will be my first new guitar, and my first tele. It is coming from canada, because tokai was sued,and can't sell their guitars in the usa. Thanks!
Walter
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Postby rustyslide » Fri Jun 02, 2006 8:08 pm

I'm really tempted to order one of those ES-60s. Stupid GAS :D
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