''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Tickle the ivories? Here's the place to talk about it.

''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby lurks » Fri Mar 25, 2005 10:49 am

Hello everybody.
First time here for me..good folks here.
Does anyone know where I can get hold of the sheetmusic for Otis Spann ..'Spann's Boogie''.
Is there any good sources for blues piano sheetmusic ?
Thanks.
lurks
Regular
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2004 11:23 am

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby meilankev » Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:39 pm

Mr lurks,

I can't help you with any source for sheet music, but I can welcome you to this wonderful site (even though I'm a rookie myself). There seems to be some folks here who know about chords and stuff. I'm sure they can help you.

Welcome!!!

Kevin
meilankev
Regular
 
Posts: 27
Joined: Tue Feb 01, 2005 7:26 pm

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby ricochet » Fri Mar 25, 2005 12:55 pm

Yeah, welcome! Dunno about the sheet music source, though.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."
User avatar
ricochet
Regular
 
Posts: 10256
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am
Location: Bristol, Tennessee, USA

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby doc williamson » Fri Mar 25, 2005 4:39 pm

Hi Lurks ~ Welcome to the BRB and the Playing Blues Piano topic. Great to have another player here. I am not a sight reader. I read chord charts and pick a song up by ear. There may be an Otis Spann songbook collection somewhere but I don't know about it. I have found musical transcriptions (sheet music) of great songs are not accurate and especially when it comes to blues greats. The sheet music I always see as an overview of the song but it rarely contains the note for note transcriptions for the licks that really make the song.

http://www.DocWilliamson.com
User avatar
doc williamson
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 150
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am
Location: Central Florida

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby jeffl » Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:05 pm

Welcome to the pile, Lurks! I'm with Doc; I don't know any guys who play blues or honky tonk piano who learn it by sheet music. I don't know any studio players though, and I suspect some of those guys learn off sheet music. Welcome.
jeffl
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 4051
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 2:04 pm

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby doc williamson » Mon Apr 04, 2005 11:03 pm

>I don't know any studio players though, and I
>suspect some of those guys learn off sheet music.

Bubba, you know a session piano player, me. Good paying session work has all but dried up here in Orlando since so many songs are recorded on a digital recorder at home, etc. When O'Ville had all those cute little boy bands that were all frontboys that didn't play an instrument there was a clique of session players for them, I wasn't in that clique nor wanted to be.

Years ago most session players were great sight readers because charts were well written and arranged. Then in the early 70s that all changed and you were judged on what you played, how you played it and how it fit into the groove and intertwined with the other instruments plus knowing when not to play was helpful. A lot of the pianists (classical type players are pianists) were lost, they HAD TO have music in front of them. The piano players (blues and rock guys who learned from records) fit right into the studios then and the better players had a lot of work around here. I remember the pianists looking down at the piano players. They are probably accountants now.

http://www.DocWilliamson.com
User avatar
doc williamson
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 150
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am
Location: Central Florida

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby jeffl » Mon Apr 04, 2005 11:19 pm

OK,OK.
jeffl
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 4051
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 2:04 pm

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby doc williamson » Tue Apr 05, 2005 12:26 am

Bubba, was I abrupt or rude? I didn't mean to be. I'm sorry.

http://www.DocWilliamson.com
User avatar
doc williamson
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 150
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am
Location: Central Florida

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby jeffl » Tue Apr 05, 2005 10:54 am

>Bubba, was I abrupt or rude? I didn't mean to be. I'm sorry.
>
>www.DocWilliamson.com
No, Doc- I wanted to jab ya' a little, and if I put a smiley face on it, it would've had absolutely no effect. And, yer point about the needs changing in different markets, with time, is well taken, too, for a different thread. But, on topic, what we have around here, is a few older musicians who are very gifted, and can read music well, but the market is so weak, they have to play with about 3-4 bands to make any money- plus, teach. One of those guys is Bill Chelf, who I've told ya' is a keyboarder, on call, anytime a touring band needs a back-up anywhere close to here. Even though he plays by ear, or reading, I wouldn't predict that he'd seek out sheet music for an old blues tune, but he might. Count Basie's stuff... then, he would.
But this is all conjecture on the part of myself.
jeffl
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 4051
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 2:04 pm

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby ricochet » Tue Apr 05, 2005 5:17 pm

Hey Doc, I like your distinction between pianists and piano players.

My music teacher, Jason Lloyd, is an awesome piano player (and guitar player, bass player), not a pianist. Doesn't even read music. When he writes down keyboard licks for me, he sort of draws a staff and puts the note letters on it, arranged more or less as the "proper" notes would be. He can play with other people in just about any sort of style spontaneously and sound absolutely fantastic, but couldn't play a written arrangement for anything. Loves to jam. He records a lot with local musicians, but thinks that if he went to the studios in Nashville he wouldn't have a chance because he can't sightread. If he can hear anything once, though, he can play it perfectly and then improvise all around it. Absolutely killer!

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."
User avatar
ricochet
Regular
 
Posts: 10256
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am
Location: Bristol, Tennessee, USA

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby lurks » Wed Apr 13, 2005 9:15 am

Thanks to you all for your warm welcome.
I was looking for the sheet music for Spann's Boogie for my 12 year old son , who is a handy boogie player. Its a shame that these treasures from old arent available in sheet music as there arent too many young players interested in these styles any more ... to keep the blues alive ... and Its not easy to find an older mentor who can pass on the tricks, as there are fewer of these guys as well.
lurks
Regular
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2004 11:23 am

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby david » Wed Apr 13, 2005 12:05 pm

>Its not easy to find an older mentor who can pass on the
>tricks, as there are fewer of these guys as well.

Welcome to the board, and you may well be in the right place. If there are any old blues guys about, they are likely to be found here.
david
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 658
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 3:06 pm

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby snakehips » Fri Apr 15, 2005 8:21 pm

Hi there !

Hey "lurks" !

My advice, from someone, now 34 years old, but started to learn blues piano /boogies by myself, when I was around 15 years old.

Let your boy pick it up for himself (without sheet music). Let him find the groove in his ears, head and heart. This will drive him to get the blues/boogie down real good. It may take some time, so start on easy tunes (if there is such a thing !!). Learn him to play a single tune, but with different "feels" / timing / tempos, to get a sense of how many ways you can play the same tune. I believe it is important to do this, to learn how to play it your own way - ie improvising.

Find a tune he can play already, and find different ways to play the tune to make it sound a little different.

Then let him have another stab at the Otis tunes and I bet he will suss out the tune better and play it with more feel.
snakehips
Regular
 
Posts: 50
Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2003 9:36 pm

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby j_tour » Sun Apr 17, 2005 6:33 pm

>Let your boy pick it up for himself (without sheet music).
>Let him find the groove in his ears, head and heart. This
>will drive him to get the blues/boogie down real good. It
>may take some time, so start on easy tunes (if there is such
>a thing !!). Learn him to play a single tune, but with
>different "feels" / timing / tempos, to get a sense of how
>many ways you can play the same tune. I believe it is
>important to do this, to learn how to play it your own way -
>ie improvising.

I'd like to second this advice -- this is really great, sound advice. Philosophical, even. I'm coming in from the place of someone who began playing blues piano at around 14-15-16, switching from guitar, transcribing whatever I could from the records themselves. I think some of the things I was working out at the time were one of Ray Charles's early Atlantic piano solos in Db (!), Ray's "The Genius After Hours" track (blues in C), John Mayall's accompaniment to Clapton on the Robert Johnson tune on "Bluesbreakers," and boogie stuff from Mac Rebennack.

After a few years or perhaps more of playing, transcribing, and listening, I've concluded that to learn how to improvise like the great musicians is to do the work oneself -- reading is useful for evaluating the accuracy of your own transcriptions, or for studying methods of notating rhythm others employ, or so forth, but reading alone just doesn't seem to cause the lessons to sink in the same way as transcribing accurately on one's own.

You don't need to be talented or have any equipment other than a sharp pencil, some staff paper, preferably some equipment which allows you to slow down fast runs, and lots of patience. I'd recommend checking justjazz.com's forum archives for the basic "philosophy" of transcribing jazz which I've found helpful for reference's sake -- I hope it's not against the rules to link to an outside site (if so, I'll erase the reference, of course) --

I only know of two half-way decent sources of Spann transcriptions out there -- one's by Eric Kriss in one of his books (which contains *a* boogie by Spann -- I don't remember which one) and the other is by ... drawing a blank on his name -- British author of a series of slim transcriptions by a bunch of diverse jazz/blues guys and chicks, I think called _Jazz Piano_ v. 6, of "Spann's Blues" (the shuffle in A on one of the Candid recordings). The problem is, just like someone said earlier, how do *you* know these are accurate? Why bother to learn the material from the page if it isn't something Spann would have played -- or, worse, isn't really playable? Not to mention that the blues is an aural tradition -- like any improvised music, the ears are going to be guiding you at whatever you're playing at.

I just did two Spann numbers about a month ago --one, "Nobody Knows My Troubles" (first solo) from Chicago, 1965 solo recording, and the second, "Tin Pan Alley," Chicago ca 1968/69 with Sammy Lawhorn, Pee Wee Madison, Calvin Jones, and Francis Clay. I could post the first one, with the proviso that it's not very accurate, probably, although it's reasonably so. The second example is a perfect illustration of why Spann's so tricky to accurately get down on paper -- I didn't even attempt to notate the rhythm. It's as difficult as anything I've transcribed, including the fastest boogie numbers, Hammond organ bebop at 300 bpm, anything, for just that reason. And it's the slowest of the slow blues -- killer low-register Spann solo, though!

I'd think that if your son wanted to make his own attempt to transcribe some Spann and possibly post the results here, he'd find a lot of help from people who own the recording and probably some offers to help complete the transcription/enter it into Finale or another notation software. I'd probably be interested in writing out a chorus, for example, and I imagine others who know standard notation might be willing to carve out some time to do so as well.

Not to stress the necessity of writing everything down -- it's just I personally got into the habit of doing that, helps with remembering and figuring out different ways of looking at the rhythms. I'd bet the vast majority of really great blues players -- hell, plenty of the greatest *jazz* musicians couldn't read -- didn't bother with that step -- but it *can* help to keep your focus on "one note at a time" on some tricky thing.

Good luck,

John
j_tour
Regular
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2005 6:50 pm

RE: ''Spann's Boogie '' sheetmusic

Postby bno » Mon Apr 18, 2005 4:25 pm

Amen to all of the above. Like nearly everyone else who plays blues and boogie woogie piano, someone showed my the basic blues scale and the basic left hand chug (the keyboard equivalent to the blues rock guitar chug - a fifth to a sixth played with a sloppy swing triplet feel). Even if you get a note for note transcription, its hard to really get the feel. Sure, I learned a notated boogie as a child, but it wasn't until a cousin of a friend showed me the scale and explained the concept that the fire was lit. Start slow and just play that blues scale on top of the left hand chug over and over and over and over. Then learn it in different keys. Learn the 12 and 16 bar blues forms. Although a lot of piano players might start out with a C blues, I would recommend getting very comfortable in G first because that's where a G tuned slide guitar will play and the G, C, D blues is pretty common in general. Also, from my experience, learning the G blues forces you to become comfortable with the D blues scale which then opens up A and E.

Then to boogie. Basically its built on rocking the left hand in octaves - 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 6, 5, 3, 1 (and variations). You have to roll that thumb/pinky octave until that fleshy muscle on the pinky side of your palm starts to cramp and hurt; it takes time to build some stamina. Listen to swing jazz bass players because a boogie piano player is basically walking a bass line. Listen to ragtime and stride players, too.

You might want to check out http://www.pgmusic.com/bluespianomasterclass.htm

I've used the Guitar Master classes and they are well done. Pretty good bang for the buck.

bno
bno
Regular
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2005 7:44 pm

Next

Return to Piano, Organ, & Keyboard

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 0 guests

cron