How to set the volume on your amp.

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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby ricochet » Thu Jul 10, 2003 1:02 pm

David, take a tip from Bosco and check the grounding on the input jack. It may be loosening up a bit. And if it's a shorting jack that's supposed to ground the input when nothing's plugged in, the shorting tab may be springing so it doesn't make good contact as well. They do that after a while.
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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby david » Thu Jul 10, 2003 3:11 pm

Thanks for the tip. I will check that. Its only about two weeks old and hasn't been used hardly at all. They just don't make 'em like they used to. Probably never did make 'em like they used to.



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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby straightblues » Thu Jul 10, 2003 4:06 pm

Obiviously in order to do this, you have to have the right sized amp. You can't do it very well with a 100 watt amp. You guitar volume would have to be at 1 or 2. However, if you have a 50 watt amp or preferably a 30 watt or below it works great. (For playing clubs you really don't need more the 30 watts anyway, IMHO.) With a smaller amp you can then turn your guitars volume up to say 5 or 6 and get the fuller sound and you still have enough treble.

I do this with both humbuckers and single coils. I tend to not like too much treble anyway. I hate the IcePick highs.
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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby rustyslide » Thu Jul 10, 2003 5:35 pm

>Obiviously in order to do this, you have to have the right
>sized amp. You can't do it very well with a 100 watt amp.
>You guitar volume would have to be at 1 or 2. However, if
>you have a 50 watt amp or preferably a 30 watt or below it
>works great. (For playing clubs you really don't need more
>the 30 watts anyway, IMHO.) With a smaller amp you can then
>turn your guitars volume up to say 5 or 6 and get the fuller
>sound and you still have enough treble.

I tend to get deafened trying this, regardless of whether I'm using my 10W'er or my 100W'er

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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby badfinger » Thu Jul 10, 2003 10:52 pm

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Jul-10-03 AT 07:06 PM (EST)]For the 'muddy' effect that often accompanies turning down the volume, the simplest answer (ie, a compromise to suit most conditions and guitar/amp combinations) is to add a small value capacitor across the terminals ('hi' and slider) of the volume control to allow some of the higher frequencies to bypass the volume pot. This will give a reasonably consistent, brighter tone at all volume settings.

The value of the capacitor will depend on many factors (such as the value of the volume pot., the quality of the lead, the input characteristics of the amp...) and so can be almost anything from, typically, 220pF to .001 microF.

Solder a pair of (shortish) wires to the ('hi' and slider) terminals of the pot. to bring outside the guitar, and hang various capacitors on the end until you get the effect you like best. Then fix it across your volume control. (If you don't want to do this, just plump for .001 microFarad.)

A thought - instead of just a capacitor, some people put a RC parallel arrangement in (typically a 150 kilohms across the added capacitor); this might be what has been done to yours) in which case, just try disconnecting this parallel resistor, leaving just the capacitor...

(Jeez! Three edits, cos tho' the bloody thing will allow some people to use all sorts of offensive language, it can't handle Greek letters... I'm not gonna mention the ##### and other birds in my garden.)

bf
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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby ricochet » Fri Jul 11, 2003 12:21 am

What kind of birds, bf? Titmice? Bustards?
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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby badfinger » Fri Jul 11, 2003 7:25 am

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Jul-11-03 AT 03:27 AM (EST)]Ah... Ric Johnson, of "Ric Johnson and The Hometown Shiners".

Salaam, Ric.

These be:

#####

bluetits (aha, that worked),

great-##### (that didn't)

coletits (success)

Daft, innit!

An experiment:

frotteuse; flagellatrix; ######; G W Bush; #####; fellatrice; #####; sodomy; arse...


Selective isn't it?

PS (to stay within the thread): I set the volume of my amp. with a little black knob.

bf
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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby hashtaff » Fri Jul 11, 2003 8:14 am

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Jul-11-03 AT 04:15 AM (EST)]I heartily concur , it seems a little bizarre to not be able to say " I got a prick in my ##### " but you can say bollocky bastard, I was feckin pricked on the breast "

"First feel really bad. Or really good. The point is to feel" doc Mojo
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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby badfinger » Fri Jul 11, 2003 11:06 am

To come back to the thread (having done so, I found myself thinking about it).

The originator was writing about achieving a particular sound or sounds, rather than "loudness" per se. However, "loudness" very quickly becomes a subject for debate.

My feelings stem from a musical experience playing acoustic instruments (violin and trumpet, mainly) in orchestras, bands (dance, jazz, brass, symphony...) where, generally speaking, amplification wasn't even a topic of conversation, never mind practice.
(With guitar, on a number of occasions I played a nylon-strung classic guitar, infront of a 20+ piece orchestra, and been heard, without amplification.)

Often, a conductor controlled, inter alia, your volume - and that of the other musicians. But even without a conductor, if, say, the piece being played called for a solo, the rest of the band/orchestra played more quietly, allowing the soloist to stand out. The result was music. Enjoyed by player and audience alike.

With the typical so-called "blues jams" etc. that I have visited around this neck of the woods (and it's probably the same elsewhere), all levels are set, initially for "solo performance", and a "true" solo is made to stand out by the soloist cranking his volume higher (he hopes) than the herd. Of course, the drummer (who thinks that it's all one long drum solo, anyway) rises to the occasion with his own increased output, countered by the other instrumentalists (each with his own 100 watt box*) - the result is something spiralling out of control, if any obtained in the first place.

*(100 watt box) A few weeks ago, MikeDev and I were in a (not-too-large) pub bar venue, confronted by a 'band' which had six 100 watt Fender guitar amplifiers - and the ubiquitous continuous drum solo - backing some guy silently mouthing into a microphone (well, the effect was silently mouthing), and all this was "enhanced" (save for the singer) by a P.A. system that looked like some form of electronic warfare array (and into which two extra microphones were being fed from - wait for it - the drum-kit). In the corner was a keyboard player (whom we couldn't hear) with her own amplifier on top of a stack of beer crates, so that she could rest her head against it - last week, in conversation, she told me that this was often the only way that she could hear her own instrument, no matter which band she was gigging with.

We didn't stay long. But they seemed to be having a ball - or something.

I'm not anti electric or amplified instruments, and make use of amplification and sound-enhancing systems myself, in some contexts, but I see, eg, the electric guitar primarily as something with a different range of sounds from an acoustic guitar - not necessarily a louder instrument.

And it does seem to be true that an electric guitar tends to be a very lonely, insecure animal, needing the company of others; and wherever two electric guitars are gathered together in any-one's name, more will surely flock, each with it's own amplifier... And then along comes a drummer!

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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby rustyslide » Fri Jul 11, 2003 12:13 pm

>(With guitar, on a number of occasions I played a
>nylon-strung classic guitar, infront of a 20+ piece
>orchestra, and been heard, without amplification.)

That's impressive. I played guitar in a "pit" orchestra for a musical production this year. I felt my acoustic would be drowned out, so I played my Les Paul through my 10W amp. I was sitting in front of the horn section, so in order to hear myself, I tipped the amp up at my head. Because we weren't actually in the pit, but rather (rear) center stage, this didn't exactly project the guitar out to the audience. I even had a couple small solos that nobody heard - even when there were no other people playing or singing *shrug* though maybe they didn't recognize them as guitar bits.



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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby badfinger » Fri Jul 11, 2003 3:35 pm

"That's impressive. I played guitar in a "pit" orchestra for a musical production this year."

Not so impressive. I bet there was PA for the stage for your gig. And you were in a pit, not seated slap bang down-centre-stage, with the orchestra behind you, and a bloody good, bastard of a conductor whipping them! I can't comment on the musicianship of "your" orchestra, but a general rule was that any one instrumentalist should always be able to hear everyone else (unless you happen to be "sitting in front of the horn section", which is not a preferred orchestral layout, as your experience showed).

Also, while the guitar "fancy bits" were happening, there wasn't much going on in the orchestra... And when they did their loud bits, I did nothing...

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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby straightblues » Fri Jul 11, 2003 10:38 pm

I am not talking about overall volume but just cranking your master volume in order to achieve power tube distortion. The sweet sound we are all seeking to play the blues.
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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby rustyslide » Sat Jul 12, 2003 12:46 am

>I bet there was PA for the stage for
>your gig. And you were in a pit, not seated slap bang
>down-centre-stage,
We weren't in a pit. We were on stage. Apparently the pit creates a wall of sound that the actors can't sing through very well. We weren't mic'd at all - two mics on the edge of stage, mostly for the singers (the principle characters had their own mics).

>with the orchestra behind you, and a
>bloody good, bastard of a conductor whipping them! I can't
>comment on the musicianship of "your" orchestra, but a
>general rule was that any one instrumentalist should always
>be able to hear everyone else (unless you happen to be
>"sitting in front of the horn section", which is not a
>preferred orchestral layout, as your experience showed).
>
>Also, while the guitar "fancy bits" were happening, there
>wasn't much going on in the orchestra... And when they did
>their loud bits, I did nothing...

I was doubling various instruments at different times - accordian, piano, horns, strings even the wood winds once or twice.

Whoever wrote the guitar music didn't know anything about guitar though - one piece was notated that I should play Eb (a 1/2 step lower than concert pitch allows). I'm good, but not that good. Maybe if I'd use a strat with a whammy bar.



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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby ricochet » Sat Jul 12, 2003 1:00 am

Power stage distortion (it's not really the tubes, but the grid circuit being overbiased by grid current that causes the distortion) isn't producible at low volume by turning up the master volume and turning down the preamp gain. Power stage distortion is only produced when the power stage is getting a signal of high enough level to overdrive the power stage. It doesn't care where the knobs are set, that just adjusts the amount of signal being passed along from the earlier stages. The output tubes themselves are always operating at the same amplification level and can't be turned up or down. So you can't get output distortion without driving it to very high volume. What you do get is a redistribution of gain among the stages, the primary effect being a reduction in the preamp distortion. And you'll see more dynamic sensitivity of the amp overall and its tone to the signal level coming out of the guitar, whether it's being altered by the guitar volume knob or pick attack. That's often considered a good thing (though it's the opposite of compression, often used as an effect in the chain.)
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RE: How to set the volume on your a

Postby skibumdog » Sat Sep 27, 2003 12:36 pm

I am still learning about amps/ guitar tone, volume settings

Roy Buchanan was supposed to have cranked his amp up all the way, and used his volume/tone controls to produce all the remarkable tones he got from his tele
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