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RE: Try this at home..

PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2003 6:00 am
by stumblin
Philosophy, eh?
This is getting to be just like the scene in 23 Railway Cuttings, East Cheam:
"Half an hour on the bed with Bertie".

RE: Try this at home..

PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2003 11:32 am
by badfinger
"you never, ever give up studying philosophy"

My prof would say that philosophy is not something one studies - it is something that one does!

"You'd hardly know that Chomsky's a linguist these days..."
Yep; hence, "read a little Chomsky, to really mix things up".

"As... Clinton once said: "What is the meaning of 'is'?""
Not so risible - I think Russell went there first!

"This is getting to be just like the scene in 23 Railway Cuttings, East Cheam: "Half an hour on the bed with Bertie"."
One would not dare aspire to such heights...

bf

RE: Try this at home..

PostPosted: Fri Jun 27, 2003 1:15 pm
by ricochet
The first thing out of the mouth of my college philosophy professor was that "Philosophy is something that can neither be taught nor learned." I thought that the State Board of Regents would be interested to know that, and I was certainly unhappy that I was required to take a class in, and be tested on, something that can neither be taught nor learned. It didn't get any better. I stuck it out for a few days. He tried to teach the unteachable by grouping us in a circle, posing questions and having the students discuss it. One day we were discussing such things as whether the "essence" of an oak tree existed in an acorn, and whether the "essence" of the tree still existed in paper made from it. The discussion was turning clearly to a consensus that there was an eternal, indestructible essence to everything. Knowing that the professor was also a Methodist minister, I waited for a break in the conversation, turned to him, and with a perfectly straight face said:
"As it was in the beginning,
Is now and ever shall be,
World without end."
His eyes got big, he broke into a big grin, and he said, "John! That's it! You've got it!" After the class he thanked me for my valuable contribution. I shook his hand, went down to the administration building and dropped the class while I still could. Still having a philosophy class requirement, I later enrolled in a Philosophy of Education class that was more like a history class. The professor in there liked to go off on angry rants about how he hated hippies and would like to beat them all to death with a baseball bat. At the time I had mid-chest-length hair, often wore ratty clothes, went barefoot in the summer and wore worn-out Keds in the winter, so I went and talked to him, vigorously agreeing with his right-wing views. (Just to make sure he didn't think I was a hippie.) Really didn't even need to go to class (and seldom did) after that to get an A. The class material about the views of John Dewey, et al, was as worthless as anything I've encountered. But now I'm all edjykated about Philosophy!

RE: Try this at home..

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2003 6:52 am
by jellyroll baker
>"As... Clinton once said: "What is the meaning of 'is'?""
>Not so risible - I think Russell went there first!

Worse: Russell spent hundreds of mind-numbing pages attempting to define "one": and he still couldn't do it.

RE: Try this at home..

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2003 6:55 am
by jellyroll baker
Forgot to add the two most mind-numbing sentences in philosophy. They are enough to make anyone take up basket weaving:

The World is all that is the case.
<lot's of confusing stuff goes here>
Of that of which we cannot speak, we must remain silent.

*OUCH* Think about it, but not too much.

RE: Try this at home..

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2003 8:00 am
by david
Ricochet, I'm sure glad I never had any of your perfessers.

I had good enough classes as an undergrad that when I went to apply for my degree in journalism (a nice marketable career, that I hated) they asked me why I hadn't put down my degree in philosophy and religious studies as well.

I had just been taking classes I was interested in to fill in my schedule every semester and ended up with more than enough hours for a major. When I was ready to graduate one of the philosophy profs told me he was working on a book on the religions of Aboriginal peoples, attempting to distill the philosophical groundings of them. He said if I would enroll in the MA program he would get me a research assistant position and they would pay me to go to school.

Hmm. Get a job or get paid to do go to school taking only what I really liked. So, I became a professional student.

By the time I got through the doctoral program I was really good at playing the game, but had seen enough to know thats not where it happens.

As Sartre said, sort of, you can either teach philosophy or do it.

Funny thing is, I farm so I can do philosophy, and I teach philosophy so I can afford to farm. This is a mixed up world. Who would have ever thunk there was more money in philosophy than in farming? And my mother told me to go to college so I could get away from the farm.

If I hadn't studied philosophy, I don't think the world would drive me crazy. Philosophy got me there first and made me understand that crazy is just a state of mind.

Well, its 4:00 am and I've got to go back to the barn to see if the mares are foaling yet.



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RE: Try this at home..

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2003 4:47 pm
by ricochet
Well, I doubt anybody's ever going to pay me to play the blues!

RE: Try this at home..

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2003 10:24 pm
by houndog
Well Rico,
one of the things this thread has asked me is "am I playing the guitar ..or is it playing me".

I now feel that it is the latter as I have found myself in all sorts of great experiences and places which I may not have usually got into...

So don't write off the future,because the great thing about the future is that it happens.

adios,
Lovat

RE: Try this at home..

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2003 11:41 pm
by ricochet
>So don't write off the future,because the great thing about
>the future is that it happens.

Now, that's worth quoting!

RE: Try this at home..

PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2003 7:57 am
by jellyroll baker
> one of the things this thread has asked me is "am I
>playing the guitar ..or is it playing me".

My goal in my playing is to reach the point where there's no difference between me and the guitar. Neither is playing the other, we're just merged into one combined form of communication. Whatever I feel expresses itself clearly and naturally in my playing. My idol in this approach is Lightnin' Hopkins. I don't want to play with his style, just his feel.
I don't aim to be a virtuoso ... just a communicator.

RE: Try this at home..

PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2003 9:02 am
by badfinger
"...the great thing about the future is that it happens."

Bur not as optimistic as GeeDubya:
"The future will be better tomorrow."

bf

RE: Try this at home..

PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2003 3:49 pm
by stumblin
"I don't aim to be a virtuoso ... just a communicator"

Fantastic, JRB, you've neatly summed up my approach to the blues.
I'm hugely relieved to find that I'm not the only one!
Thanks :)