Blues scales

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Blues scales

Postby aussie_skater » Fri Jan 20, 2006 10:35 am

can any1 here hook me up with some blues scales and ways to play em. cheers guys.
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RE: Blues scales

Postby lightninboy » Fri Jan 20, 2006 11:44 am

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Jan-20-06 AT 12:48 PM (EST)]Play a minor pentatonic scale, and add the Major 3rd, b5th, 6th and 9th(major 2nd) degree's.
Its my favourite blues scale. It covers 5 frets, so its a stretch.
You have to make up your own mind how to play it, but here's a tip.
Be aware of the major and minor tonalities.
When your on the I & V chords, use a major tonality (major 3rd), and use a minor tonality (b 3rd)on the IV chord, over any standard blues progression.
If you don't know what any of this stuff means, then find out!
Its not hard to learn, and very important.
Have fun.
LB.
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RE: Blues scales

Postby allanlummox » Fri Jan 20, 2006 6:14 pm

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RE: Blues scales

Postby tot_ou_tard » Tue Feb 21, 2006 1:37 pm

Thanks Allan,

That is a cool page.

Allan

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It looks like this post resolved nicely to the tonic in the key of Allan.
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Postby Huddie Ledbetter » Wed Jun 07, 2006 8:25 am

Minor Pentatonic Scale
|-R-|---|---|-X-|---|
|-X-|---|---|-X-|---|
|-X-|---|-X-|---|---|
|-X-|---|-R-|---|---|
|-X-|---|-X-|---|---|
|-R-|---|---|-X-|---|

Blues Scale
|-R-|---|---|-X-|---|
|-X-|---|---|-X-|---|
|-X-|---|-X-|-X-|---|
|-X-|---|-R-|---|---|
|-X-|-X-|-X-|---|---|
|-R-|---|---|-X-|---|
(R=Root)

Notice the blue note in both octaves of the blues scale (b5). These are shapes which can be played anywhere on the keyboard. Email me if you want shapes to play all over the fretboard (i have them on my computer) or if you're confused, i'm happy to help.
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Postby RonVermillion » Tue Jun 20, 2006 6:05 pm

I like the Huddie Ledbetter scales.

I also discovered something some years back. The minor pentatonic scale diagrams a box which sits on top of the first position barre chord. These position things are up for discussion I guess, but I learned that the open E chord was the first position pattern. When you use your first finger in the position occupied by the nut and make the E chord with your second, third and forth fingers you are making a first position chord and can move it to any fret that you want and go up the chromatic scale. So on the third fret it is a G on the 5th fret it is an A etc. On top of that 5th fret A first position sits the minor pentatonc scale that Huddie Ledbetter diagrammed.

the trick: You can play in a relative minor scale of a major chord and sound "outside the box" and do just fine. This means that if you are improvising in a chord (key) you could do it in the relative minor . If you were in C the relative minor is Am. Am scale is a C6th scale. So when the band is jamming you play in C or Am and you will still sound OK.

Looking at the Minor Pentatonic scale BOX sitting over the chord realize that the relative minor of that chord is three frets back and the minor pentatonic BOX of the relative minor is sitting just back of the BOX for the chord you are playing in. In effect, with the exception of a couple of notes that you will soon find that are clinkers, you can play in the BOX over the tonic chord of which Key you are in, and you can play in an identical BOX that sits just above it on the neck. The higher notes end of the box closest to the nut is the the lower notes fret of the next BOX.

Knowing this you now have six frets and two imaginary boxes sitting together one on top of the other to improvise in.

Next week tune in for the BB King, and Albert King boxes that sit below the original first position BOX and you will have four Box patters to imrovise in with only about 3% chance of hitting a clinker.

When you hit the off note clinker, bend the heck out of it, and do it three times in a row, then resolve to the 3rd b and it will become a cool lick - and other people will want to copy your new lick LOL (another guitar star is born)

Ron
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Postby ricochet » Tue Jun 20, 2006 6:28 pm

A simpler way of thinking about that "playing the blues scale of the relative minor of the key you're in" is that it's the Major Blues Scale, a.k.a. Traditional Blues Scale, heavily used in New Orleans piano music & old Southern gospel. As the Blues Scale is the minor pentatonic + the b5, this is the major pentatonic + b3. Both work over a major key I-IV-5 backing, but the minor blues scale will work over a minor key also, while the major won't. If you're playing in a major key, you can mix and match from the two scales.

The difference in thinking of this as the Major Blues Scale is that your tonal center is now in the key you're in, not one three frets off. If you simply move the same blues licks down three frets, it kinda sounds funny to keep landing on the sixth.
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