Digital Drums

[Locked - post in relevant instrument/gig/recording section]

RE: Digital Drums

Postby jeffl » Sat Aug 07, 2004 2:53 pm

S'right, Bob! That's where a harp player learns the difference between an old Gibson F5 Mando vs. a new Fender.
jeffl
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 4051
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 2:04 pm

RE: Digital Drums

Postby seanmack » Sat Aug 07, 2004 4:59 pm

I've been chatting with the guys in the drum shop here, and according to some of the old drummers round this way, the 'wash' sounds from cymbals eventually destroy your top end and it sounds like everyones talking with hands over their mouths. Fortunately though, it seems that a specifically designed kind of ear plug (the name's eluded me, though i've got it written down somewhere)that means you can still hear everything thats going on, but it screens out the harmful frenquencies- or something similar.
User avatar
seanmack
Regular
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Sat Jul 31, 2004 6:43 pm

RE: Digital Drums

Postby jeffl » Sat Aug 07, 2004 5:45 pm

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Aug-07-04 AT 01:47 PM (EST)]Sean: did any of those drummers have any comments on digital drums, or did the conversations not swing that way? (incidentally, one of the cool features on my buddy's set was the ability to go to double-kick mode on the bass)
jeffl
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 4051
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 2:04 pm

RE: Digital Drums

Postby seanmack » Sun Aug 08, 2004 9:53 pm

No, not as such. They were just basically warning me against not protecting my ears. I know a few players who use digital kits though, and they all swear that the convenience and ease of transporting etc and ability to utterly control the sound outweighs the difference in tone and sound. I geuss i was just thinking of them as they were when i first played one, about 7 years ago and they sounded like a computer simulation of drums ratehr than drums themselves.
User avatar
seanmack
Regular
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Sat Jul 31, 2004 6:43 pm

RE: Digital Drums

Postby david » Sun Aug 08, 2004 11:03 pm

I have wondered if I am being like the "old timers" must have been when electric guitars came around--they just don't sound the same.

Then people quit trying to use electric guitars like louder acoustics and there turned out to be a legitimate place for both. Maybe the same thing will happen with digital drums.

It is pretty clear, to me anyway, that they don't really sound right when trying to be just an alternative to "acoustic" drums.
david
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 658
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 3:06 pm

RE: Digital Drums

Postby seanmack » Mon Aug 09, 2004 9:01 pm

Good point that. There are certain bands that use digital drums, and in the 80's it semmed every british drummer had one. They seem to be used to a degree in hip-hop, so they do indeed have their place
User avatar
seanmack
Regular
 
Posts: 19
Joined: Sat Jul 31, 2004 6:43 pm

RE: Digital Drums

Postby david » Tue Aug 10, 2004 12:15 pm

They seem to be used to a degree in hip-hop, so they do
>indeed have their place


Not a good example for an old foggey like myself, who often wonders if hip-hop has a place. I guess I find myself (always a shock) wondering how you tell which hip-hop musicians are the talented ones and which are the wankers.

But, I also remember hearing the same kind of comments from my folks the night we watched the Beatles on Ed Sullivan.
david
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 658
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 3:06 pm

RE: Digital Drums

Postby jeffl » Tue Aug 10, 2004 6:16 pm

Prob'ly the same mix of artists vs. wankers in Hip Hop as in any other form of music. One thing alotta those guys do to write is what I've always considered a cheap shortcut, mainly used in jamming: They'll start with a digital percussion groove, and lay a "tune" over it- so, the beat, or groove, controls the tune. I've done it many times jammin' around the house, when nobody's got a tune, and we're all suffering from food or alcohol overload: you throw a rhythm down, then add a chord progression, then make up lyrics. Chancey songwriting at best, but the Hip Hop artists talk about working that way all the time; one guy'll work out a drum groove on his box, lay in the loop, and call a buddy to run it by him, and, Presto, here comes a tune! If I'm not mistaken, R.L. Burnside has a few tunes that sound like they may have started this way. Does anybody here know him well enough to give us a verdict on my suspicion?
jeffl
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 4051
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 2:04 pm

RE: Digital Drums

Postby ricochet » Tue Aug 10, 2004 6:46 pm

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Aug-10-04 AT 03:01 PM (EST)]R.L. didn't do those. Tom Rothrock did, in the studio, using samples taken out of some of R.L.'s recorded tracks. The results went on "Come On In." R.L. didn't like it when he heard it, but he did when the money started rolling in, and he got a big new fan base that wouldn't've ever listened to traditional blues but decided they liked it after hearing the hopped-up stuff. My daughter's a big fan of his, after first hearing "It's Bad, You Know." If you listen to the oft-repeated samples of R.L. on that one, they came out of "Goin' Down South" and "The Engineer Blow The Whistle." They used a synthesized rhythm track (that sounds more techno than hip-hop to me) and some heavily reverbed harmonica riffs; I don't know who laid those down.

Last night I got my copy of his new CD, "A Bothered Mind," to be released generally on August 18. It's mostly stuff that's been remixed to hip-hop from his traditional songs, with some rapping thrown in over it. A couple of his traditional pieces are on there straight. That's a hook to get the younger folks checking out the old music. It's well done. My daughter's going to steal it, so I'll have to buy another copy. I took it to last night's Billy Crawford Band blues concert and jam; I thought they might not like it since they're heavily into the old time blues, but they played it for the music during breaks and really did like it. I also saw one of the club waiters go over and study the CD cover to find out what he was listening to. This CD won't please any hard core blues purists, but it'll be a big hit with the public.

I especially like the first track. About 30 seconds of hard rocking guitar (probably by Kenny Brown) with R.L. saying over it: "I'm R.L. Burnside. I do what I want to."

:7
User avatar
ricochet
Regular
 
Posts: 10256
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am
Location: Bristol, Tennessee, USA

RE: Digital Drums

Postby jeffl » Tue Aug 10, 2004 7:29 pm

Rico: you are right on me, on that one! I've heard that body of work also, in fact, it's in my Jeep right now, and I think they did a pretty good job of leaving vintage blues elements in, especially the lyrics delivery, and the guitar grooves as well. The modern elements include shifting rhythm modes for short periods, adding yells over the top, and driving bass lines more often found in hip hop, or even grunge, as well as bass roots at the fifth ( or dominant, is it?). My wife had this very discussion with me while listening to it, and we argued a little about where some of the stylistic elements came from. I think it wuz a good job, on the CD, in general.
jeffl
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 4051
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 2:04 pm

RE: Digital Drums

Postby ricochet » Wed Aug 11, 2004 11:03 pm

My daughter has absconded with the CD. She E-mailed me that she really likes it. BTW, she pointed out to me that the guest "singer" on "My Name Is Robert, Too" is Kid Rock.
User avatar
ricochet
Regular
 
Posts: 10256
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am
Location: Bristol, Tennessee, USA

RE: Digital Drums

Postby david » Thu Aug 12, 2004 3:11 am

Wasn't his father governor of Minnesotta?
david
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 658
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 3:06 pm

RE: Digital Drums

Postby ricochet » Thu Aug 12, 2004 6:22 pm

R.L. Burnside's?
User avatar
ricochet
Regular
 
Posts: 10256
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am
Location: Bristol, Tennessee, USA

RE: Digital Drums

Postby david » Fri Aug 13, 2004 4:32 am

You're right. Must've been a cousin.
david
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 658
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 3:06 pm

RE: Digital Drums

Postby 601blues » Tue Feb 21, 2006 6:08 pm

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Feb-21-06 AT 01:12 PM (EST)]I can't fault a drummer wantin to surrond himself with all da cool drum stuff, but I have a set of double bass drums in my studio,and man I used to cringe at the thought of recordin drum parts, to mic everything and get sound right was a hit or miss thang and to record them along with every one was a nightmare, TILL i got a set of yahama digital drums, they have over 250 drum kits programed into it and the sound is everything Ive tried to get with mic's in no time at all, I had a drummer fall in love with em,did a live show amnd ran em thu the PA and the sound was fantistic!! Thease are stick sensative and responds to how hard you hit em, Just my 2cents but if I played drums Thats the way I would go no problem! Ive heard people say they don't sound Like accou,drums! no they don't But Electric Guitars don't sound Like accous.guitars either, so whats the point if your playin in an eletric band the digital drums sound great,but if your playin all accoustic,then you might be right.
User avatar
601blues
Regular
 
Posts: 1919
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2006 6:03 pm
Location: Mississippi

PreviousNext

Return to Wish I'd Known This!!

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron