lori lu on drums

Problems, how to get them, favorite songs to play, groupies, funky bar owners, etc. NO names of clubs, please.

Postby bluesrules » Fri May 26, 2006 8:36 pm

Hey lorilu,

Not sure what other advice I could give that you don't already know but here are a couple of things that I was told by mentors when I was growing up ( a looooooong time ago :shock: ) and it applies to all instruments.

1.) "Just think if you were to work at this like an 8 hour a day job how good you could become". He was referring to practicing/gigging that much. I still try to put in at least an hour a day. Drums are such a physical instrument that you need to work your muscles like any athlete would. Use it or loose it.

2.) The blues purists amongst us will not like this but I saw in another post where you would like to play full time. "You need to become proficient in as many styles of music as you possibly can to be a working musician." That was probably the single best piece of advice I was ever handed.

3.) It's also about relationships. You've got to be someone musicians like to hang with. Especially as drummers. We can't go it alone (unless we do clinics). Who wants to hear a 4 hour drum solo? Not even drummers would want that! :D

Like I said you probably already knew all that but if you have any specific questions please feel free ask. I'm more than happy to share what little I've picked up along the way.
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Postby lorilu » Fri May 26, 2006 10:27 pm

Thanks so much, Mark. I actually love the idea at becoming proficient at all kinds of music. I am not a purist about too many things except being honest and true to myself and others and living in the world in a positive way. I have been working somewhat at all kinds of music. Do you think it's possible to work and earn a living as a drummer? I love hanging out and talking and listening and playing music. That is not really the problem. I WILL move on when I don't like what's going on, though. It would be like a dream to work on this like a regular job. I don't start practice till night time - no matter what. I try to stay in physical shape and to keep up my chops. I would really love to devote a lot, lot more time to this.
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Postby lorilu » Fri May 26, 2006 10:29 pm

It seems like, too, the more I play the more fun it is. So glad there's a drummer here, by the way. I know you know what I'm talking about - this is no easy feat, is it? Spent some time at drum clinics and have taken some time off from that although it's probably time to immerse again.
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Postby bluesrules » Fri May 26, 2006 11:52 pm

Lorilu,

Yes, it is possible to make a living at playing drums if your material needs are little or you have a significant other who 1.) Has a day gig with health insurance and 2.) Is completely supportive of you.

I wasn't able to raise a family doing it hence the day gig. 3 kids, private schools and health insurance was too much for a working drummer.

I would add here that if you intend on making a living at this you should also get sight reading under your belt if you don't already have it. Studio work is an important piece of the puzzle. So unless you make it big with a band then for most it is a combination of gigging, teaching and studio work. Some also choose a day gig that is in the business. Like working at GC or something like that. I couldn't do that (too much mindless noise :)) but others do. Some also suppliment by becoming recording engineers. Many of us now have decent enough home studios to generate some cash that way. I don't do others music but I did learn how to become a recording engineer and that has paid off very well indeed. It makes me that much more valuable as a musician. That and I also learned how to play guitar well enough to write some tunes. It's just that much more I can bring to the table. Others are appreciative of it and it helps me get work.

The best thing to start with is to NOT give up whatever you're doing now for income but to jump right in and see where the path leads. Hopefully at some point you'll be able to transition to full time.

One thing is certain. It is a really tough way to go. Ya got to be thick skinned.
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Postby bluesrules » Fri May 26, 2006 11:57 pm

btw imho drum clinics are OK but are usually a vehicle for a famous drummer to show boat. Not all are like that but most. It's more about selling equipment and such. If you don't already have one find a good teacher. A good teacher is worth every penny. Ask some of your favorite local drummers who they studied with or if they teach.
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Postby lorilu » Sat May 27, 2006 2:23 pm

Mark,
Well, I am not thick skinned at all. I have taken a lot of things to heart and let it really get to me. People can be very competitive, backstabbing and petty even at the lower levels and unfortunately I have received a LOT of that. Maybe that stuff has made me thicker skinned. We'll find out. I backed out of bands and everything for quite some time now and have just been working on my skills (like Napoleon Dynamite). I figured if I was gonna get emotionally beat up all the time I'd rather it be by better musicians :P Actually, I found the better the musicians the more humble and supportive although not always. This site has become my connection with music and little by little am trying to find other people to play with eventually. I like the idea of a spouse supporting me, though, but I won't quit my day job. I did have a teacher for awhile but ran out of money so got what I could out of it. He wrote a few exercise books and I still work out of them. We got into jazz, world beats, a lot of reading, of course, linear patterns, all kinds of stuff. He's a 3rd generation drummer and a serious, serious professional - one of the best around this area. There are so many good drummers with a huge head start on me doing studio work I am not sure if that would be an option for me ever. What do you suggest? The studio is like a dream. I do try to expand in any way possible although my focus lately has been on earning a living which has been difficult. But when I'm not really focused on music I feel like a huge part of me is missing and I feel unsatisfied. My ideal situation would be to double my practice time on drums and keep on with the other instruments, though not at the same level. "A dream is in the mind of the believer, and in the hands of the doer. You are not given a dream without being given the power to make it come true." I keep this up on the wall along with a few other things that remind me to keep sight of my dreams. Sometimes you just have to be patient. I have a lot of other things in my life that I need to take care of and they have to be first right now. It's finding the balance and not losing sight of the goal and dream.
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