Practice regiments.

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Practice regiments.

Postby spud camp » Sat Apr 22, 2006 2:40 pm

I realized this morning that the time I have been spending practicing, is a total waste. I dont do any constructive stuff, just lots of tinkering. I made a resolution to start putting some structure to my time spent. I was thinking 45 minutes in the A.M. to work on fundamentals, picking, scales, etc. Then 45 minutes in the evening to just play around, and try to put the fundamentals together, learn songs etc. Any other time would be spent rehearsing songs.
I was just wondering if anyone out there would be so kind as to share your practice regiment, and maybe some advice. Thanks in advance.
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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby mickeypainless » Sat Apr 22, 2006 3:09 pm

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Apr-22-06 AT 11:10 AM (EST)]>>>I realized this morning that the time I have been spending practicing, is a total waste

IMO any time spent playing is beneficial and never a total waste man! I too need to add more structure to my practice time! I actually wrote up a curriculum once but only adhered to it for about a week.
Your game plan looks good and I may just follow suit!
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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby allanlummox » Sat Apr 22, 2006 3:30 pm

As long as you are actually putting the time in with a guitar in your hands, you're going to make some kind of progress - the real work is getting your hands strong, loose and comfortable with the guitar - the exercise.

The brain part is liable to come in bursts - you'll hear something, figure something out, some theory thing will click into place.

Of course, spending time learning theory is always time well spent.

Budgeting your time better will help, as well. Just make sure you leave time to just putz around with the guitar, too.
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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby mickeypainless » Sat Apr 22, 2006 3:35 pm

>>>the real work is getting your hands strong, loose and comfortable with the guitar

I need help with my finger span! Any suggestions? Part of my problem is that my pinky has been smashed and bit by horses so many times that when fretting it sometimes spaz's out or goes numb! No real problem with a slide, just fretting!
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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby allanlummox » Sat Apr 22, 2006 3:45 pm

I went into a Martial Arts store once, planning to buy a device called an "Eagle Catcher".

http://www.aiyafitness.com/pics-inv-oth ... atcher.jpg

The clerk asked what I wanted it for, and showed me an exercise - both arms extended straight out, open and close the hands fully and rapidly 100 times - that would improve circulation to the hands and make them stronger.

You should also do gentle stretches with your hands. And remember, they need time to warm up, too.

http://www.hisnibs.com/ChineseExercise% ... _small.jpg

These are good.
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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby mickeypainless » Sat Apr 22, 2006 5:11 pm

That "Eagle Catcher" is AWESOME! Gotta get me one!
I've had a set of the steel balls (no comments) for years and use em to aid in arthritis control!
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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby ricochet » Sat Apr 22, 2006 5:12 pm

Do you have to take the same precautions in cold weather as with brass ones?

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."
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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby mickeypainless » Sat Apr 22, 2006 5:25 pm

The "Eagle Catcher" is certainly cheap enuff!

http://www.karatedepot.com/tr-ex-05.html

>>>Do you have to take the same precautions in cold weather as with brass ones?

You bet! Nuttin worse than icy balls!
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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby boogiechillun85 » Sat Apr 22, 2006 6:05 pm

I don't know, I never had a "practice regime" and I'm great. ;)
Scales are boring. If you want to do something, figure out songs..
Jim
http://www.soundclick.com/jimnjblues
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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby allanlummox » Sat Apr 22, 2006 6:24 pm

Actually, Kung Fu Store Dude did not recomend the Eagle Catcher for the guitarist - and said that there'd be a good risk of injury.
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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby ricochet » Sat Apr 22, 2006 11:39 pm

I'm wondering if this thread means we should go regimental to practice?

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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby spud camp » Sun Apr 23, 2006 2:06 am

Yeah you could be the Colonel.....sorry, probably not the best choice of words. You know what I meant. I am an Idahoan, youll have to be patient. We drive "outfits", and have "borrow pits" along the sides of the roads". The English language is not our best subject if ya know what I mean.

How about you Ric, do you have a formal scedule for practice?

I know playing is never a waste of time, I just dont want to be re-enforcing, bad habits. I would rather develop good ones.
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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby ricochet » Sun Apr 23, 2006 2:12 am

> How about you Ric, do you have a formal schedule for practice?

Heck, no.


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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby fat paul » Sun Apr 23, 2006 11:38 am

Chords and scales are just means to an end. When I was a young, just starting out guitar player(6 years old)My brother taught me songs like my girl. After learning many songs and playing for hours a day I started to learn scales and how to put them to use. If I had started with the boring crap first I probably would not be playing today.
Learn alot of songs first and enjoy making MUSIC. Thats what attracted you in the first place
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RE: Practice regiments.

Postby lightninboy » Sun Apr 23, 2006 1:47 pm

Spud,
great post; and yes, your idea is correct.
Practising things you can already do is a waste of time.
You "perform" things you can already play, whether for yourself or an audience, but don't worry about practising them. Use your practise time for other things.
I've met guys who have been playing for 20 to 30 years, almost every day, and are still very basic. They just keep on pluckin' the same old stuff.

Getting a guitar teacher is the best way to advance.
Not only do you learn the correct way, but you have to practise or else you'll get into trouble next lesson for being a slacker!

Once you can play something, move on to something else.
And don't be scared to learn some theory. Its not hard, and lots of fun to use.

Learning songs is a great way to advance.
You should also have an understanding of harmony theory.

Its important not to learn a heap of scales/chords/runs/arpeggio's/techniques, etc., and not know how to apply them. You must be able to apply these things to your playing.

There are lots of different ways/methods to approach these things, but its important to have just one.
Thats why you should have a teacher.
If you can't afford a teacher, get a good book or DVD in the style your interested in.
You will then learn a "method" of playing.

(I use Mickey Bakers Jazz books one & two, for jazz and blues, with great results from students).
My good friend Kirk Lorange also has a great book, called "Plane Talk". I highly recommend it. Its a fantastic, and simple method of combining harmony theory with 3 basic chord shape's.
Google it, it'll show up like a rash!

My profession is teaching guitar, and has been since 1983.
So I know a little bit about this subject. :)
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