Blues solo.

A discussion of techniques, and equipment for guitar. Fretted, bottleneck or slide, acoustic or electric, this is the place.

Postby santo » Wed Jul 12, 2006 7:11 pm

6's 7's & 9's. If you're going to solo then practice and get to know your scales, like they are the combination to the lock on the crapper door. Get to know them so you can run them in your head and drop a finger anyplace in the scale and skip and go to the next sound in your head anywhere in the scale. Get your chord sounding and start your scale for melody. Keep practicing, especially if you feel like you want to give up. Speed some things up, then slow it down. Drag a chord up or down one fret at a time. Listen to the old R & B guys. Find the sweet chords, like the 9's. I love the blues with the 9's for the 4 & 5. That's the moan, the wail, and the shout depending on how they are played. Get somebody to play the 1,4,5 and you solo. Then return the favor, and you play the chords and let them solo. Copy nothing, but "steal" a little something from every picker you see and hear!!
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Postby bigdaddy » Wed Jul 12, 2006 11:01 pm

Ain't nothin' wrong with book learnin'. Certainly cheaper than paying for a guitar teacher each week. I have been going back over the pentatonic minor myself this past week. Helps to pull out of the rut. Not many people can just pick up a guitar and play. We all have to learn. I watch blues guitarist and they're all playin' in some scale or other. Solo's can take alot of time to do. My guitarist tends to do sceamin' solo's the first few times thru the song but after we play that song for months his solo's lose a little fire. I tell him to stop trying to do it the same everyday but to just let it flow. Get in that pattern and let 'er rip. When he does his solos are inspired. Like the pressure is off him to do it the way he's been doing it. Solo's get the people screaming but it's still the rythym section that gets them movin'. Why is it called solo? So-low. Should be "so hi" or "little frets". When he solo's he's high on the neck more than he is low. Solo doesn't sound right.
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Postby goldbrick » Thu Jul 13, 2006 2:29 am

I highly recommend the Warren Haynes video for soloing theory that is usable
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Postby maxx england » Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:29 am

Brolis_Bliuzas wrote:My good friend and well known player in our country is against all learning from books and videos. He says that only from jams and improvising you have to build your own style because otherwise you lose you identity. I think it is bit stupid but I say nothing to him because i respect him too much.
You know I would like to have same journals but where I live it is very difficult because we don't have any stores like that. Maybe you could recomend some places on the internet.


You have to find your own best path, we all learn in different ways and at different speeds. Just keep on with it, never let go of being hungry.
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Postby Brolis_Bliuzas » Thu Jul 13, 2006 12:23 pm

I already have this video and it is very good tape full of informasion and lessons and it is easy to find using lime wire.
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Postby bigdaddy » Fri Jul 28, 2006 6:26 pm

Been workin' that penatonic minor scale. Was at a friends house and he had a Stevie Ray video on and I watched it, knowing what he was doin'. I went home, stuck that compressor between the guitar and the amp and let loose. That scale broke wide open. It is so easy and so much fun. The fingers just do their thing and blues music comes out of the speaker. I ain't no Stevie but I am developing my own style. Gonna use it at my street beggin' gig in a few hours. It sounds good to my ears but I'll have to wait and see how passer by's react to it. Everything comes so slow for me, but I am glad it's comin'.
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Postby Brolis_Bliuzas » Fri Jul 28, 2006 6:30 pm

Go for it. Develop your own style. Congratulations that you stopped copying other players and started your own way.
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Postby stratman_27 » Fri Jul 28, 2006 10:41 pm

Usually my solo technique is mostly by what I'm feeling at the time. I like the bending singing stuff with a few double stop licks thrown in. Most of mine are put together on the fly. I have a basic idea of what I want to sound like and the licks are in my head. Sometimes they find their way to my fingers sometimes it ends up being something else.
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Postby BadBoyJones » Tue Aug 01, 2006 7:25 pm

My first post on here :D

I think a good way of learning how to play improvised solos is first (ofcourse) learn your scales and then learn different styles. Not only like Texas Blues, Chicago Blues but also the styles of different guitarists. And when you have that done you start creating your own style by just finding what your good at and what keeps you satisfied... anyway, thats what Hendrix did

greetings
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Postby T-bone » Wed Aug 02, 2006 9:15 am

Whenever I want to pick up something new or I run short of ideas I always go back to Mr. T-Bone Walker. I feel that much of his stuff has not been recycled as much as, let=s say BB or Albert King. There seem to be an endless amount of licks and themes in his playing that you can build upon. Anyway, I always seem to get a lot of inspiration after listening to his old records.
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Postby bigdaddy » Wed Aug 02, 2006 11:07 pm

Played my stuff on the street last Friday and made $21. People were stopping and listening. One couple asked me if I knew any classics and I told them no. I also said that my band has forced me to learn some of the classics but it just don't feel right to me when I can play my own music as easy as breathing. I don't learn anyones songs. I do six covers with the band on bass but it's when we fire up one of mine that I come alive. With the new guitar thing I'm doin' I feel so good doin' it. Really. I can't put the guitar down. Flip on the SR-16 and play, play, play. It's a riot. In the past I have played chords and wrote lyrics but these days I can do the licks the chords, put it altogether. It's like I've been set free inside. The music has been trickling thru a hole in the dam all these years and now the whole dam has come down and the music is bursting forth. I'm excited for this Friday night so I can exhibit the skills I've learned this week. I don't think about what I am doin', I relax both arms and start in on that strat. I'm amazed at the melodies and riffs that come forth. I've been blessed.
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Postby TheDude » Thu Aug 03, 2006 8:55 am

You've got so many avenues to learn something these days... Books, magazines, videos, internet, teachers, friends, favorite players,... We're spoilt for choice.

Learn whatever you can. It's ok to cop a lick from someone, I reckon. Just break it down, find out what makes that lick work and flip it around and make it your own. Don't just blindly cop licks, but be creative and change them. Sometimes you can change the feel of a lick just by playing it in a different location, or by adding slides or bends.

George Benson once said: I always borrow a lot of licks. I don't steal them. I borrow them.

One trick I always like to share is that Freddie King sound... He uses those 6s, 9s and both the 3rd and flat 3rd. Well, an easy way to remember all this is to mix the pentatonic minor and major and the blues scale together. Then you have this scale: 1 2 b3 3 4 b5 5 6 b7.

Learn from other instruments too, not just guitarists! Robben Ford for example, was influenced by jazz saxophone players.

Sounds really cool to play maybe a jazzy arpeggio lick followed by a powerful Albert King style lick with those huge bends.
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Postby ricochet » Thu Aug 03, 2006 12:58 pm

That's what I've been calling the "Super Blues Scale." :lol:
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Postby TheDude » Thu Aug 03, 2006 1:32 pm

ricochet wrote:That's what I've been calling the "Super Blues Scale." :lol:


:lol: Yeah, I guess you could call it that. Technically I like to think of it as mixolydian with 2 extra notes (b3 / b5). Works everytime. Except for a minor blues of course.
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Postby ricochet » Thu Aug 03, 2006 2:10 pm

It's the major and minor blues scales combined.
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