My latest build

A discussion of techniques, and equipment for guitar. Fretted, bottleneck or slide, acoustic or electric, this is the place.

Re: My latest build

Postby OldWailer » Thu Feb 24, 2011 4:47 am

I found this information on baritone guitar--in case anybody else finds it of interest: (more information at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baritone_guitar


The baritone guitar is a variation on the standard guitar, with a longer scale length that allows it to be tuned to a lower range. It first appeared in the classical music realm. The Danelectro Company was the first to introduce the electric baritone guitar in the late 1950s, and the instrument began to appear in surf music, as well as background music for many movie soundtracks, especially spaghetti westerns. In more recent history, the baritone guitar has found use within rock and metal. Some Baritone guitars may also have the capacity to be used as a bass guitar if strung correctly.

A standard guitar's standard tuning (from lowest string to highest) is E A D G B E. Baritone guitars are usually tuned a perfect fifth lower (A D G C E A), a perfect fourth lower (B E A D F♯ B), or a major third lower (C F B♭ E♭ G C). Gretsch, Fender, Gibson (EB-6), PRS Guitars, Music Man, Danelectro, Jerry Jones, Burns London and many other companies have produced baritone guitars since the 1960s, although always in small numbers due to low popularity.[1]

Baritone guitars have larger bodies than standard guitars, especially in the case of acoustic instruments, and have longer scale lengths which allow the strings to be tuned lower while remaining close to or at normal tension. On a standard, steel-string, acoustic guitar, the scale length (the distance from the nut or string guide to the saddle on the bridge) is typically 24.9" to 25.7", and the strings range in diameter from .012" to .054". The scale lengths of various baritone designs range from 27" to 30.5", and the string gauges range from the normal .012 - .054" set to sets as thick as .017 - .095". Shorter-scale baritone guitars are more like long-scale guitars, having more midrange volume, whereas the longer scale lengths and heavier string sets give more bass to the instrument's timbre. Shorter scale baritones tend to be tuned C-C or B-B whereas longer ones are typically tuned A-A.[1]

"Tic-tac bass" is a method of playing, in which a muted baritone guitar doubles the part played by the bass guitar or double bass. The method is commonly used in country music.[2][3]
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Re: My latest build

Postby zhyla » Thu Feb 24, 2011 4:50 am

Baritone refers to the range of the guitar. They are typically a 4th or 5th lower than a regular guitar. On a normal baritone guitar the scale length needs to be somewhat long, in the 27-30" range. Because lap steels are immune to string tension you can use thicker strings on a shorter scale. So yes, with appropriate strings you should be able to tune your 26" instrument down to the baritone range.

I went with 30" for this build because 30" is really pushing the lower boundary for a bass guitar and the upper boundary for a baritone. So it was a nice compromise.
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Re: My latest build

Postby OldWailer » Thu Feb 24, 2011 6:43 am

OK! I think I got it now--when I'm due for a string change on my 26", I'm going to try some heavy strings and tune down--might be an interesting sound. I don't want to change too soon though--I'm still having too much fun with it the way it is.
Thanks for the help, Zhyla. . .
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Re: My latest build

Postby Kowalski » Mon Aug 08, 2011 8:07 am

whoah, is it a doubleneck lap-steel's headstock...?
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