Don't Worry 'bout The Bear

Your chance to write big-time blues reviews. Only two rules: First, if you're connected to the band or artist, go to Shameless Promotion; Second, don't write a book -- keep it relatively short and simple, no 1,000+ word epics.

Oh .. and make it fun.

Don't Worry 'bout The Bear

Postby blueswriter » Fri Jan 07, 2005 6:24 pm

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Jan-07-05 AT 01:30 PM (EST)]Various Artists
Don't Worry 'bout The Bear
Big Bear/Sanctuary (2003) 81268-2

http://cover6.cduniverse.com/MuzeAudioA ... 473171.jpg

32 tracks, 2 CDs, 122 minutes. Highly recommended. Although Jim 'The Bear' Simpson states in his opening liner notes that "The 1970s were good to the Blues," what isn't mentioned is that it might not have been quite so good without his own involvement and his deep respect for the music and the sometimes unsung and overlooked heroes that were still playing regularly (or trying to). Simpson played an integral role by putting together the American Blues Legends tours and seeing that Snooky Pryor, Homesick James, Big John Wrencher, Eddie "Playboy" Taylor, Johnny Mars, Boogie Woogie Red and many others managed to record, travel, and hopefully put some money in their pockets before traveling back to the United States from Europe. While everything here has been previously issued, the recordings that fill out this two-disc set are welcome additions in this form; a smartly done compilation with the above-named blues performers plus loads more from Erwin Helfer, Charles Brown, Doctor Ross, Tommy Tucker Mickey "Guitar" Baker, Eddie "Guitar" Burns, Billy "The Kid" Emerson, Whispering Smith, Lightnin' Slim, Billy Boy Arnold, Wille Mabon, G.P. Jackson, Baby Boy Warren, Cousin Joe Pleasant, and Gene "The Mighty Flea" Connors. Highlights abound and far too numerous to list individually, but of particular note are Eddie Taylor's Seems Like A Million Years and Ready For Eddie with stunning guitar work, Doctor Ross clobbering the oft-covered Mannish Boy and a wonderful pairing of Ross with the 'Chicago Aces' (Lafayette Leake, Louis and Dave Myers, and Fred Below) for Got Something To Tell You, G.P. Jackson's 12th Street Boogie, and many other standouts. This superb set includes towering performances (both 'live' and studio) from artists that perhaps never got the attention they fully deserved in this country, but it's rewarding to know that our friends in the UK were taking the helm and helping out as much as possible. A highly recommended and worthwhile set of vintage blues from the 1970s that's sure to please with lengthy and detailed notes from 'The Bear' himself.

http://www.bigbearmusic.com/

© 2004 by Craig Ruskey
User avatar
blueswriter
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 314
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 1:58 pm

RE: Don't Worry 'bout The Bear

Postby jeffl » Fri Jan 07, 2005 7:07 pm

Gotta love those blues names: It kills me every time I hear Lightnin' say on one cut, "Not too many of us here; me, LongGone, Mack, and myself." And, B-dub, how did LongGone get his name... from the song, "Long Gone, Like a Turkey"...?
jeffl
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 4051
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 2:04 pm

RE: Don't Worry 'bout The Bear

Postby blueswriter » Fri Jan 07, 2005 8:32 pm

I'd imagine you're asking about Luke Long Gone Miles. It's entirely possible the name evolved from the song, although Miles never specified. His comments were...

"The first day I met Lightnin' he named me Long Gone and I've been Long Gone Miles ever since. I guess there's no man on earth I'd rather be with than him."
User avatar
blueswriter
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 314
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 1:58 pm

RE: Don't Worry 'bout The Bear

Postby jeffl » Fri Jan 07, 2005 8:34 pm

Thanks Dub..
jeffl
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 4051
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2005 2:04 pm


Return to Reviews The Blues

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron