Clapton Concert

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Clapton Concert

Postby scrappercondor » Mon Jul 26, 2004 4:21 pm

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Jul-26-04 AT 03:18 PM (EST)]I saw Eric Clapton Saturday night here in Denver. I watched the 1997 DVD - Live in Hyde Park last week and wasn't impressed, so I wasn't expecting much from his Saturday performance. The highlight from the DVD was "I'm Tore Down", where he played a good, melodic solo, like he used to do back in the sixties and seventies. I was hoping he'd play it Saturday. That or Further on Up The Road like he did with The Band on "The Last Waltz" DVD. That's probably my favorite Clapton style of playing. His old, pure blues style. Not the super-fast lick oriented playing that is typical of a lot of his solos these days.

He took the stage Saturday night, sharing guitar duties with Doyle Bramhall II who plays left handed but strings his guitar like a right handed guitar. Probably used an open tuning like Albert King. Bramhall's playing was good, but more important, I think he pushed Clapton a little. I could also hear a little Robert Randolph influence in Clapton's playing on one song. (Randolph opened the show.) Clapton's playing was melodic on many songs, but still relied on those boring, really fast three fingered runs that pollute most of his solos. He did a good version of Robert Johnson's "They're Red Hot", and "I shot the Sherif". He also did the fast version of "Layla", like the one off the album with the same name. The opening lick brought everyone to their feet, where we stayed throughout the remainder of the show.

The diference between Clapton's playing now and his older playing is his older playing was more melodic and the solos better formed. They went through time like a story. They had a beginning, then built to a climax, and an end. His playing now seems to go right into the climax. Randolph did the same thing.

Probably the low point of the show was the sappy "Wonderful Tonight". A lot of people in the audience seemed to really like it - the wimpy soft-rockers who would probably be happier at an Eagles concert! Clapton should have passed the vocals on "Got My Mojo Working" over to Randolph, who joined Claption for the encores. Clapton's a legendary guitar player, but I didn't believe for a second he had his "Mojo Working"! LOL! It was a good show, though. I figured I had to see him at least once. He's getting on up there in years and this might be his last tour.
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby dfduck » Mon Jul 26, 2004 7:49 pm

I saw Clapton at the Denver Donkey Stadium somewhere around 1975. It was ok.. but fairly unimpressive and the worst show I saw while living in Denver.

I went to a lot of concerts when I lived there because there was little else to do in that town for entertainment. I always hated the venue, having to buy a seat and you damned well better sit in it. I'm from California and was used to festival seating where you buy a ticket to get in and sit wherever you want or roam at will.

At one point I felt brave and walked up to the edge of the stage. I could have reached out and touched Clapton's shoe. He looked down at me several times while playing. Then I saw out of the corner of my eyes about 10 cops coming from each end of the stage toward me. I slowly started backing up, still watching Clapton play, when I hit what seemed to be a brick wall. I looked up over my shoulder to see a BIG black cop standing there with his arms crossed looking down at me, with another 9 cops behind him. They sent 30 frickin' cops after me because I had walked up to the stage. So I scurried around him and back to my seat and damned well sat for the rest of the show. No standing up allowed, no dancing. That placed sucked for concerts. Bah
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby scrappercondor » Tue Jul 27, 2004 4:22 am

You're not one of those people who has to dance at their seat when everybody else is stitting down, are you? Damn, that's anoying! :O) I like to just sit in my seat and listen to the music, so I kind of prefer assigned seating (I'm getting old!). I never went a concert at the old Mile High Stadium or it's replacement, Invesco Field (they tore down the old stadium a few years ago). Clapton played at the Pepsi Center, which has great sound. I've heard horror stories about the sound at Mile High Stadium and Invesco Field.
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby david » Tue Jul 27, 2004 9:00 pm

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Jul-27-04 AT 05:02 PM (EST)]I don't dance, but the only assigned seat concert I ever really liked was Zappa at a small supper club in Denver. I sat about ten feet from the stage and ate supper while Frank and the Mothers of Invention jammed away. Between songs Frank asked the folks at our table if the desserts were any good.

When he wasn't doing a solo he sat off to the side on a stool and smoked, or conducted the band through the more technical parts. At one point he was doing one of his classic in-your-face leads and had been playing with his head leaned back and his eyes closed, then he looked me straight in the eye and just grinned great big. It was like he was saying, "yeah, I'm good." He had the an attitude as over the top as Houndog Taylor, but the technical proficiency of John McLaughlin or Al Dimeola.

I had seen him in Louisville in a stadium, but in the small venue he was incredibly personable. I went to hear his guitar playing, but his drummer really impressed me. Man, could he build a groove and just sit right there in the middle of it. His name was Chester Thompson, if I remember right.
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby ricochet » Wed Jul 28, 2004 1:04 am

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Jul-27-04 AT 09:04 PM (EST)]Frank Zappa was my musical hero when I was a teenager. He was fantastically talented, and surrounded himself with other musical geniuses.
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby bluesmcgoo » Wed Jul 28, 2004 1:59 am

Same here Ric.

My favorite Zappa album, "Bongo Fury" still gets regular playtime. "Live in New York" is great too.
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby scrappercondor » Wed Jul 28, 2004 3:47 am

I've been told by a few people that I look like Frank Zappa. I don't know if that's a good thing or not. (Hopefully they meant when he was still alive and healthy!)
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby hogwldfltr » Fri May 13, 2005 3:18 am

I got to see Zappa several times during the 70s. He is still one of my favorite musicians of all times. When I saw him he was Touring with Flo and Eddie. Billy the Mountain and The Mud Shark were on the venue. My favorite album of his was Hot Rats. Jazz brilliance!
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby grady » Fri May 13, 2005 4:13 am

I recently got hold of the "Me and Mr Johnson" cd.

I like it.

I know a lot of people don't but,,,,I think it's refreshing to hear RJ's stuff done in a new way with a bunch of great Musicians.
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby ricochet » Fri May 13, 2005 1:21 pm

Hot Rats is my favorite, too. And "Willy the Pimp" is an all-time classic.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby hogwldfltr » Sun May 15, 2005 4:14 am

To be more on topic with the discussion. Zappa always seemed to be able to inspire with his music. He will always be a challenge to try to play. I've been studying Clapton's music lately; especially the Unplugged CD. Although some of the songs are challenging, there is a lot of fairly simple music at least as far as I can tell from the published tab and learning to play it. I'm almost disappointed by how accessible it really is.
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby ricochet » Sun May 15, 2005 9:56 pm

There's nothing wrong with "accessible" music. Clapton's stuff's been a great inspiration to me. Gives me hope that some pretty good sounding stuff can be easy to play.

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby grady » Sun May 15, 2005 11:46 pm

>There's nothing wrong with "accessible" music. Clapton's
>stuff's been a great inspiration to me. Gives me hope that
>some pretty good sounding stuff can be easy to play.
>
>"A cheerful heart is good medicine."

I gotta agree with that.
I've been studying the "Unplugged" cd too the past few days.
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby hogwldfltr » Mon May 16, 2005 3:46 am

I was just simple surprised by the ease of a lot of the songs. Also we were on the discussion of Zappa. Obviously Clapton is the better guitarist being alive and all. I am definitely not a blues purist. FWIW Blues and Rock are both pretty dead as far as I can tell; seems like rap had taken over, IMHO. I feel like a dinosaur.
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RE: Clapton Concert

Postby ricochet » Mon May 16, 2005 12:47 pm

Dead guys usually don't play too well.

Neither do I, but that's another story.

Know what you mean about the "dinosaur" thing.

I am encouraged to hear my 17 year old son in the basement playing Led Zeppelin stuff on his guitar. He thinks Jimmy Page is the greatest guitarist ever. Reckon there's going to be a cult of "rock purists" in the next generation?

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."
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