Paul Oscher

Your chance to write big-time blues reviews. Only two rules: First, if you're connected to the band or artist, go to Shameless Promotion; Second, don't write a book -- keep it relatively short and simple, no 1,000+ word epics.

Oh .. and make it fun.

Paul Oscher

Postby blueswriter » Fri Jun 17, 2005 4:20 pm

[updated:LAST EDITED ON Jun-17-05 AT 05:31 PM (EST)]Paul Oscher
Down In The Delta
Blues Fidelity (2005) BF1001

http://cdbaby.com/covers/p/a/pauloscher.jpg

14 tracks, 51 minutes. Recommended. The name Paul Oscher should require little in the way of introductions for the seasoned blues listeners reading this, but for those unfamiliar with his background, Oscher's career stretches back to the 1960s when he became the first full-time caucasian bandmember in the ranks of the acclaimed Muddy Waters outfit. Over the years Paul has continued playing (save for a period in the 1980s when he quit the business) and has developed into a multi-instrumentalist of amazing power and capability. Recent recording projects have included work on a variety of labels; his mostly solo effort "Alone With The Blues," Johnny Dyer and Mark Hummel's "Rolling Fork Revisted," Hubert Sumlin's "About Them Shoes," and "That Represent Man" from the Mannish Boys, plus others. Much like his Electro-Fi set, the soon-to-be-released Down In The Delta features Oscher's talents as a vocalist as well as his remarkable guitar, harmonica, piano, and melodica playing, and for good measure, he gets support on a handful of tracks from pianist Dave Maxwell, bassists Calvin Jones, Mudcat Ward, or Ronnie James Weber, plus drumming assistance from Willie "Big Eyes" Smith, Richard Innes, and Levon Helm. Oscher has retained the influences of Muddy Waters, Otis Spann, Johnny Young and a cast of others, turned them into his own brilliant style, and here he delivers a rich blend of approaches from the lowdown Blues Before Sunrise with Paul's uncanny organ-sounding melodica, his Spann-infused piano on Blues And Trouble with grunting vocals, or his raspy rack-harp and guitar on standouts 32 - 20 Blues, I'm Goin' Away Baby, Sugar Mama, and Driftin' Blues. The true sleeper on the disc is the original So Lonesome where Paul's voice and throaty chromatic harmonica are pushed to stunning depths with Ward's rumbling bass and Helm's juke-joint drum work. While over-production and gimmicks have become accepted staples of the music industry, Paul Oscher will sit comfortably by with a few friends, and hopefully watch the world speed along as he continues making soulful, heartfelt blues records that stand as testaments to his deeply-rooted background. Set for a mid-July release, advance copies are now available. Simply wonderful stuff.

http://www.pauloscher.com/

© 2005 by Craig Ruskey
User avatar
blueswriter
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 314
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 1:58 pm

RE: Paul Oscher

Postby doc williamson » Sun Jun 19, 2005 6:38 pm

BW ~ I didn't know if we were in agreement about Paul Oscher and his talent when I first looked at your review of this CD. I read "Recommended" on this CD and thought ~ "WHAT?" Then I saw it is about his upcoming release that I haven't heard yet.

On "Alone With The Blues" I was just stunned by the beauty, simplicity and starkness of the whole project and on one track it sounds and feels like an early 1950s Chicago Blues band.

How does Paul's new effort stack up against "Alone With The Blues"? Thank you and, as always thanks for posting your reviews here.

http://www.DocWilliamson.com

"I chose to sing the blues." Ray Charles
User avatar
doc williamson
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 150
Joined: Thu Jan 01, 1970 12:00 am
Location: Central Florida

RE: Paul Oscher

Postby blueswriter » Sun Jun 19, 2005 11:31 pm

Hey Doc...

Thanks for reading and commenting. As far as comparing Alone With The Blues to the soon-to-be-released Down In The Delta, there are a number of similarities. As on his earlier CD, Paul goes a little more than half of the new disc playing solo, and for the balance, he's joined by a few friends. Both discs also have Oscher originals (7 on Alone - 4 on Delta) mixed with some classics and traditional pieces. I didn't find the new CD to have as much of a dark feel as the other, but both are super efforts. Bottom line... if you enjoyed Alone With The Blues you should find Down In The Delta just as satisfying as there ain't a dud to be found on either of his last two. Then again, I can't think of anything by Paul that was.
User avatar
blueswriter
Contributor
Contributor
 
Posts: 314
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 1:58 pm


Return to Reviews The Blues

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron