Learned some new techniques last night

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Learned some new techniques last night

Postby jagarner70 » Mon Jun 26, 2006 2:33 pm

So last night I learned about split fours or playing an octive, and something called vamping. The split fours were ok but the vamping was very cool. The techinque calls for you to start out on a chord and then slam your tongue down for the single note. You can keep starting with new breaths or hold the note while continuing to move from chord to single note. I'm sure most people on the forum are very familiar with this technique but I thought I would post it for any other rookies like myself.
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Postby jeffl » Mon Jun 26, 2006 3:15 pm

Good on ya',jargarner70! The technique you described as vamping I don't believe derives its name from the technique,but from WHEN it's used in a tune. My understanding of vamping is that it applies to a musical accent that is used primarily to add rhythm to a phrase or passage. For example,in orchestral music,the french horn section may be assigned a series of measures where they play single notes (often eighth notes) on the upbeat (i.e.,one AND two AND three AND,etc.),primarily to supply rhythm. Vamping on the upbeat,when done sloppily,can either race or drag the beat (it can drag it when you vamp slightly behind the upbeat) ,or in blues it can wreck the groove. There are a number of techniques used to vamp,and the chord to single note technique you've discovered is just one of them. Chucking or kisspops can be used in the same way. Now,bear in mind that blues and rock musicians get their training in various ways,and in some areas of the country or world, musical terms can take on meanings either more general or specific than they were originally assigned in classroom settings, so some guys from other places in the world may have a different take on this. It'd be interesting to find out.
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kisspops

Postby jagarner70 » Mon Jun 26, 2006 3:21 pm

can you describe the kisspop technique? also, are you an aussie?
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Postby bosco » Mon Jun 26, 2006 10:24 pm

in some areas of the country or world, musical terms can take on meanings either more general or specific....

In these parts, vamping means the entire band stays on a single chord (usually the 1 chord) for a protracted period of time, without going to the 4 and 5 until cued. This is done often for song intros or mid song band introductions or announcements before the break etc.

Coincidentally, this is the absolute easiest time to comp on a harp as well because you don't have to deal with the changes. It's easy to see why someone would give a harp technique this term, although in this case I think comping is what jag is actually doing and just vamping in the key of the song.

A "kisspop" is when you bring the harp up to your mouth, blow quickly through a pucker and pull the harp away immediately upon doing so. You get a slightly more stuccato or punchy effect without residual overtones of adrawn out chord and it also looks cool as a stage move.
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Postby thebluesbox » Mon Jun 26, 2006 11:05 pm

I think the technique he is discribing is tongue slaps. Its like tongue blocking except you slap your tongue down on the holes after you have started blowing them already.
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Postby jeffl » Tue Jun 27, 2006 5:09 pm

No, I'm not an Aussie; my ancestors migrated to England from Ireland back in the 1700s,and then to Canada,and finally the U.S.,where I live. I'm a harper from southern Minnesota.
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Postby kingley » Tue Jun 27, 2006 5:47 pm

The technique I believe everybody is trying to describe is this:

Put your tongue against the first 3 holes of your harp and then as you draw your breath in quickly lift off your tongue and then replace it on the harp.
It's like saying tu, tu ,tu ,tu ,tu with your tongue, think Silence of the Lambs, "and a nice Chianti tu, tu, tu " then slow that down.

If you do this once it's a cool effect. But you can play it rhythmically to great effect.

Ryan Hartt uses to great effect in this video at the 3.33 minute marker.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ElG1XMhP ... an%20hartt


Hope this helps
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