Page 2 of 2

Re: Amp and mic for a newbie harp player?

PostPosted: Tue Oct 05, 2010 5:11 am
by gheumann
John, you might want to download and read a document I wrote recently called All About Harmonica Microphones and Then Some...

There's a lot of info there that I think you'll find useful - about mics AND amps.

Cheers

Re: Amp and mic for a newbie harp player?

PostPosted: Tue Oct 05, 2010 4:02 pm
by jeffl
Hey Greg, that was a great article! I downloaded it for my "Bible", a series of downloads I've kept.
I've played harp for 45 years, being a continual hobbyist (jamming or gigging every week with the same bunch for years), and I've never been super-techy. I've always relied on basic advice from other harpers, plus my own experience, and generally use a 520DX through either a Epi 5-watt Valve Special or my Peavey Classic 30, downtubed. These are plenty adequate for the tone I seek, but your information is valuable in the event I decide to make any changes.

My favorite amp of all time to blow through is an old Ampeg Reverb Rocket single 12, through the Accordian jack. I passed on one a few years back for $425, since I wasn't gigging and was short of bucks. Brilliant, aren't I...? :lol:

BTW, although I own a Blues Blaster mic , I've preferred the feel,heft, and tone of the 520 for my grip and embrochure. I have no negative reaction to the weight of the Shure during long gigs, and prefer it over the light feel of the both the shell and cable of the Blues Blaster. I've even added a little weight to the rig by putting an XLR connector below the shell.

At some point I will try one of your custom mics.

Re: Amp and mic for a newbie harp player?

PostPosted: Thu Oct 07, 2010 5:10 am
by gheumann
"The mic and amp are just amplification."

If you believe that I have some snake oil you might be interested in. Only $19 per ounce, it will cure the common cold, remove warts, stiffen your johnson and turn you into a world class dancer. Honest.

Saying "The mic and amp are just amplification" is just as much B.S. as saying "all tone comes from the amp and mic." NEITHER are true. I'm so tired of people saying the gear doesn't matter. Of COURSE you have to have good tone. If you want to have good amplified tone, there's a boatload more stuff to learn. There's nothing wrong with learning it too. The better you are at playing amplified, the more you will hear the difference between gear.

"YOU are the instrument" ??? No, you AND your harp are your instrument. And when you play amplified, You, your harp, your mic and your amp are your instrument.

Thanks. I feel better now.

Re: Amp and mic for a newbie harp player?

PostPosted: Fri Oct 08, 2010 3:33 pm
by torncone
No, you AND your harp are your instrument. And when you play amplified, You, your harp, your mic and your amp are your instrument.


Yup, +1

My rig is a GB-520 into a Boss DD-3, into Fender Champion 600. A lot of guys use delays in their rigs, and after I played through one I could see why, even though I liked the tone I was getting straight into the 600. If your tone needs some good old fat honking SQUONK to nail that classic Chicago sound, try a delay.

Re: Amp and mic for a newbie harp player?

PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 6:20 am
by Cincinnati Slim
gheumann wrote:...you AND your harp are your instrument. And when you play amplified, You, your harp, your mic and your amp are your instrument.


+2

Re: Amp and mic for a newbie harp player?

PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 6:24 pm
by OldWailer
I personally don't believe a beginner should even consider amping up for practice. The first thing the beginner needs is to learn to get a good acoustic sound.

Cupping a mic and using the rig is a whole nuther thang--but none of it will amount to anything without that good acoustic base.

Just another opinion. . . :shock:

Re: Amp and mic for a newbie harp player?

PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 6:45 pm
by jeffl
OldWailer wrote:I personally don't believe a beginner should even consider amping up for practice. The first thing the beginner needs is to learn to get a good acoustic sound.

Cupping a mic and using the rig is a whole nuther thang--but none of it will amount to anything without that good acoustic base.

Just another opinion. . . :shock:

In theory, I agree with you Wailer, but my opinion is colored by the fact that I learned to play the "acoustic" way simply 'cuz it didn't dawn on me to buy a mic & amp. We were playing country blues and when we amplified, I just played off a 58 that I also sang through.

It could be said that if you develop too many hard habits regarding use of the hands when playing acoustically then you have more adapting to do when you learn to play a cupped mic, but hey, nobody said it'd be easy. I'm just glad I learned as a kid, before I got all complicated. :)