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Big Road Blues Discussion Forums 2013-01-19T19:10:36+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/feed.php?f=3&t=13069 2013-01-19T19:10:36+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13069&p=115464#p115464 <![CDATA[Re: The Secret...]]> In general, long tunes don't lend themselves to swappin' out the dance floor, but that's all guesswork.
I still think grinnin' & smilin' is an under-rated tool for connecting with the crowd. (It's hard to do if yer playin' harp,too. :) )

Statistics: Posted by jeffl — Sat Jan 19, 2013 7:10 pm


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2013-01-19T18:39:52+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13069&p=115463#p115463 <![CDATA[Re: The Secret...]]>
gatorblue wrote:
I think it gets back to not just playing for yourself, but playing for the audience too. Many blues musicians forget that. You can be as pure as you like, but deal with the crowd you can draw accordingly.


Really connecting with the audience seems to involve "reading the audience". If they're diggin' long solos, take long solos. If it's big changes in dynamics, go for it. Go with what works. If it's not working, try something else. If they're talking on their phones, turn it up to 11 :D

Statistics: Posted by Jakeblues — Sat Jan 19, 2013 6:39 pm


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2013-01-19T17:33:44+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13069&p=115462#p115462 <![CDATA[Re: The Secret...]]> Students and foreigners love our straight up blues,old people and kids love the hokum tunes and the dancers like the swing. Lots of folks these days also just don;t dig live music ( at least here in south Florida) they would rather talk on the phone . We don't do classic rock or use any backing tracks so it is what it is-we play what we like otherwise it would be just another crappy job-and i love playing to much to let that happen

Statistics: Posted by goldbrick — Sat Jan 19, 2013 5:33 pm


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2013-01-19T14:35:46+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13069&p=115457#p115457 <![CDATA[Re: The Secret...]]> Statistics: Posted by jeffl — Sat Jan 19, 2013 2:35 pm


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2013-01-19T00:39:42+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13069&p=115453#p115453 <![CDATA[Re: The Secret...]]> Statistics: Posted by 1four5 — Sat Jan 19, 2013 12:39 am


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2013-01-18T23:13:39+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13069&p=115452#p115452 <![CDATA[Re: The Secret...]]> Statistics: Posted by jeffl — Fri Jan 18, 2013 11:13 pm


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2013-01-18T22:50:11+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13069&p=115451#p115451 <![CDATA[Re: The Secret...]]>
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFPhYoR9Ebs

Rick Honeyboy Hart

Statistics: Posted by Honeyboy — Fri Jan 18, 2013 10:50 pm


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2012-12-05T17:40:04+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13069&p=114896#p114896 <![CDATA[Re: The Secret...]]>
But back when I was living in Mississippi I ended up going down a path similar to the one gatorblue took. To heck with the folks who had come to listen, I had reached a point where I was boring myself to death. So I took da bluz down some side roads and started adding all kinds of spices to the stew. I might show up one night with some ladies from a Baptist church choir to help with vocals and the next night with an accordian player. Yeah, we played "Let It Bleed" as well as "Salt of the Earth." If the guy with the accordian was there you might just hear "Wooly Bully" or "96 Tears" sandwiched in between some Kid Bailey, Bessie Smith or Lighnin' Hopkins. Not saying it was a great technical achievement in music. I think part of what was boring me was that I had become hung up on pursuing technique as diligently as possible. It was loose and boozy and lyrics and endings could get messed up in a hearbeat. But it was fun and that fun could be infectious.

Statistics: Posted by Lo-Fi — Wed Dec 05, 2012 5:40 pm


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2012-12-01T17:13:45+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13069&p=114770#p114770 <![CDATA[Re: The Secret...]]> Statistics: Posted by houserocker — Sat Dec 01, 2012 5:13 pm


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2012-11-21T02:46:14+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13069&p=114631#p114631 <![CDATA[Re: The Secret...]]> My answer is always the same--go to the the Smithsonian in DC where they have the song list Muddy Waters was using in Mississippi the week that Alan Lomax first recorded him in the delta. You'll find a lot of great blues songs, but you'll also find songs by Gene Autry, Hoagy Carmichael standards, and jazz hits of the day. My point is, Muddy realized that if you don't give the crowd some variety you're probably not going to be playing much.

A few years ago, I doubled up from my blues gigs and started doing a side-deal ---an acoustic gig that was 3-4 guys, depending on the nite. We did a lot of standards from the 40s as well as some Fats Waller and ragtime. We had guitars, mandolins, banjos, harp, and even an oboe some nights. It was a great time, we found a whole new audience and I learned a great deal playing that music which had much more complicated chord progressions and changes than blues songs. Blind Blake did some pretty heavy stuff--just play it sometime and you'll realize how deep the guy could be.

I think it gets back to not just playing for yourself, but playing for the audience too. Many blues musicians forget that. You can be as pure as you like, but deal with the crowd you can draw accordingly.

Statistics: Posted by gatorblue — Wed Nov 21, 2012 2:46 am


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