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Big Road Blues Discussion Forums 2005-02-02T17:20:45+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/feed.php?f=11&t=1088 2005-02-02T17:20:45+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1088&p=11589#p11589 <![CDATA[RE: Well, my first post might as well be in t]]> >is a type of music theory - just personalized, and without
>the formal knowledge of the commonly accepted
>jargon/terminology.

Exactly!

Statistics: Posted by ricochet — Wed Feb 02, 2005 5:20 pm


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2005-02-02T17:17:36+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1088&p=11588#p11588 <![CDATA[RE: Well, my first post might as well be in t]]>
Perhaps we're getting hung up on semantics here. I certainly have no formal knowledge of music theory. Hell, I never even cared to learn the official names of the different notes and chords. I've gone out of my way to stay as ignorant to this type of fundamental knowledge as possible.

However, I've been composing songs for almost 30 years (songs I play for folks). How do I do it? Do I just stumble around on the piano until I luckily find some notes that sound good when I haphazardly string them together? Of course not. There can be growth without knowing the proper terms.

From playing as long as I have, I have developed my own foundation of knowledge when it comes to composing new material or re-creating something I've heard. Perhaps this is a type of music theory - just personalized, and without the formal knowledge of the commonly accepted jargon/terminology. And I fully admit my knowledge is a small subset of what there is to be learned.

Could I benefit by absorbing all the music theory known to mankind? Sure, as long as I can learn it without having to know where a "G" note is on the piano. :)

Kevin

Statistics: Posted by meilankev — Wed Feb 02, 2005 5:17 pm


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2005-02-02T16:11:12+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1088&p=11587#p11587 <![CDATA[RE: Well, my first post might as well be in t]]> >So, have fun playing your music without theory. But don't
>think that not knowing any theory somehow makes you a better
>musician. It ain't so.


No doubt about it, I'm gonna have to figure out how to put those little smiley faces in my posts.

Statistics: Posted by david — Wed Feb 02, 2005 4:11 pm


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2005-02-02T15:42:36+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1088&p=11586#p11586 <![CDATA[RE: Well, my first post might as well be in t]]> >there isn't any theory to playing slide! Is there?

Of course there is.

Music theory's just a system of "rules" about what's previously been found by experience to sound good. Gives you ways of predicting things that'd likely sound good if you tried 'em, that you might not've thought of on your own. Learning music theory can't kill your musical creativity any more than learning English grammar and vocabulary can kill your writing ability. It's just a set of tools that you use to enhance your creativity. You can "reinvent the wheel" by experimenting on your own, but you're not going to find anything that hasn't been done already, over and over, long ago. Lots of folks with a good "feel" for music, of course, come up with great music without ever being able to state systematically what they're doing and why it works, which is fine. But knowing some of the theory behind it can help to communicate to others what you're doing and help them contribute to it. (Or learn from you to do stuff like you're doing more easily.)

The classical musicians have no experience improvising. That's their trouble with playing blues or other improvisational music. Not that they know music theory. In fact, IMO they're the ones with the least need to understand music theory, because they're only using it in the abstract to describe what they're playing, and playing only what's written on the sheet in front of them. (Those who compose classical music, of course, rely heavily on music theory, and as bluesmen do, on the conventions of their musical tradition.)

So, have fun playing your music without theory. But don't think that not knowing any theory somehow makes you a better musician. It ain't so.

Statistics: Posted by ricochet — Wed Feb 02, 2005 3:42 pm


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2005-02-02T13:05:11+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1088&p=11585#p11585 <![CDATA[RE: Well, my first post might as well be in t]]> Statistics: Posted by jeffl — Wed Feb 02, 2005 1:05 pm


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2005-02-02T12:41:03+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1088&p=11584#p11584 <![CDATA[RE: Well, my first post might as well be in t]]>
Thanks for the invite. About 20 years ago, a friend back in Texas loaned me a recording machine, and I put together a couple of cassettes. One was of some of my original stuff, and one was some of my favorites from others. Hmmm, I need to see if I can find those - I haven't listened to them in God-knows-when.

As for contributing to a new CD, I'll ask some of my audio friends here in Tampa if they have anyway of recording live music to CD. If I can find a way, I think it would be cool to do this, and send you a song or two.

Of course, don't confuse my unlimited enthusiasm with some expectation of talent. :)

++++++++

David,

I have a pretty wide assortment of Blues artists upstairs (probably around 40 artists), but I don't have more than 4 or 5 from any one guy. Lately, I've been on a Bill Broonzy kick, and I have been exposing his music to everyone I can. Some of my other favorites are Willie Dixon, Howlin' Wolf, and Rice Miller. For Christmas, I got myself brand new 180g vinyl copies of Memphis Slim "At the Gate of Horn", Leadbelly "Good Morning Blues", and two by Lightnin' Hopkins: "Free Form Blues" and "Trip on Blues". It's really cool to find "new" releases of material from these type of artists.

And unlike many people who prefer their Blues from these (and other)"authentic" historical figures, I'm also capable of enjoying listening to more modern "pseudo-blues" performers like Allman Bros, Janis Joplin, John Mayall, and Stevie Ray Vaughan. And last but not least, Tom Waits (whose music is a distant kin of the Blues) has been my favorite and most influential musician and pianist. So, I'm not a total "Blues Snob". :)

Kevin

Statistics: Posted by meilankev — Wed Feb 02, 2005 12:41 pm


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2005-02-02T08:52:42+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1088&p=11583#p11583 <![CDATA[RE: Well, my first post might as well be in t]]> David there is,
see Houndogic Yogic Logic below...:D

Statistics: Posted by houndog — Wed Feb 02, 2005 8:52 am


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2005-02-02T04:10:47+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1088&p=11582#p11582 <![CDATA[RE: Well, my first post might as well be in t]]>
Welcome to the board.

What blues do you listen to most?

Statistics: Posted by david — Wed Feb 02, 2005 4:10 am


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2005-02-01T22:47:11+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1088&p=11581#p11581 <![CDATA[RE: Well, my first post might as well be in t]]> http://www.musictheory.net and it allows you to learn it at your own pace.

Statistics: Posted by barbequebob — Tue Feb 01, 2005 10:47 pm


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2005-02-01T21:50:37+00:00 http://www.bigroadblues.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1088&p=11580#p11580 <![CDATA[RE: Well, my first post might as well be in t]]> Statistics: Posted by jeffl — Tue Feb 01, 2005 9:50 pm


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